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Thread: Linux Driver Support Still Leaves A Lot To Desire

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  1. #1
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    Default Linux Driver Support Still Leaves A Lot To Desire

    Phoronix: Linux Driver Support Still Leaves A Lot To Desire

    A few days ago when I shared the biggest problems with Linux as judged by the Phoronix community, at least a few people took issue with the fact that some of the ugly issues with Linux were pointed out...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTEyNDA

  2. #2
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    I'm not saying your criticism is unfounded but it does show that you are biased towards modern gaming hardware. Gaming hardware is usually made for windows, hence the driver trouble.

    As I'm no gamer, do not care for Creative soundcards or high resolution mice I find linux driver support far better than in windows.

    Also often the Linux driver is better than the windows one, they get more testing because kernel drivers support a certain chip while win drivers support a certain manufacturer's card.

    Thanks for banning Quadri-whatever by the way

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by ariendj View Post
    I'm not saying your criticism is unfounded but it does show that you are biased towards modern gaming hardware. Gaming hardware is usually made for windows, hence the driver trouble.

    As I'm no gamer, do not care for Creative soundcards or high resolution mice I find linux driver support far better than in windows.

    Also often the Linux driver is better than the windows one, they get more testing because kernel drivers support a certain chip while win drivers support a certain manufacturer's card.

    Thanks for banning Quadri-whatever by the way
    Yeah, I'll take stable drivers over bloody nightmare any time.

    And as everyone has experienced, drivers on Windoze, while possibly "available" are rarely convenient to "make work". Most people familiar with wondoze have had the experience of FIGHTING it to get the drivers working. Here at work, one of the network printers is COMPLETELY UNUSABLE for wondoze, because the drivers, though they "exist", simply do not work.

    Also a fun time trying to make any graphics card drivers actually work in microshit. I'm sure that most people are familiar with the problem of having the drivers "installed", but the stupid piece of shit refuses to apply them to the hardware.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by ariendj View Post
    Thanks for banning Quadri-whatever by the way
    I did not know that, awesome!

    The thing with driver problems is that it affects only certain hardware. Many distributions (Ubuntu, RHEL and SLED) already have certifications programs for hardware vendors. Unfortunately this is still mostly limited to high-end hardware and I think it's something that Canonical for example should push futher. Linux can never have support for all the hardware in existence but it sure can support thousands upon thousands of different combinations. Having standardized Linux driver support certification process is something I would go after. Most printers and many network cards already have the Tux logo and this could be extended to cover just about everything.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by ariendj View Post
    I'm not saying your criticism is unfounded but it does show that you are biased towards modern gaming hardware. Gaming hardware is usually made for windows, hence the driver trouble.

    As I'm no gamer, do not care for Creative soundcards or high resolution mice I find linux driver support far better than in windows.

    Also often the Linux driver is better than the windows one, they get more testing because kernel drivers support a certain chip while win drivers support a certain manufacturer's card.

    Thanks for banning Quadri-whatever by the way
    Gaming hardware is sound cards and graphic cards? Sound is something I think everyone wants working. Graphics acceleration has become standard in nearly everything. Even FireFox is accelerated. OpenCL would have applications outside of games as well.

    Also, like it or not, people don't go out and buy the latest fastest computer for typing documents and sending out E-Mails.

    You're either....

    A. An artist who's going to need the fastest graphics hardware anyway.
    B. A gamer who wants the best frames per second.
    C. Someone who has too much money.

  6. #6
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    Default Woa

    Let's focus on the issue, and not on gamer hate (what the hell?).

    If our graphics drivers better supported Linux, we'd all be using to Wayland very shortly.
    We could get rid of our old cruft that is X11.

    That's #1 reason our graphics drivers need to be better.

    Also, S3TC- hasn't that uncertainty cleared up? And if not, why isn't the Linux Foundation purchasing this?

    Linux needs a patent anti-troll non-profit to buy up patents that threaten or hold Linux back.

  7. #7
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    Wow...I'm supprised no one else seems to have noticed what I've noticed...

    Easy and out of the box hardware support very much matters on the distro. For instance, on Kubuntu, all of my hardware works out of the box. On Fedora KDE, only one of two printers works. The printer that does work has a built in scanner and fax machine, but the scanner does not work. I think part of the goal should be to get all of the drivers properly into the kernel so it's always out of the box support, not only on certain distros. I suspect that in the long run it would save developer time so that they could focus efforts on other stuff.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prescience500 View Post
    Wow...I'm supprised no one else seems to have noticed what I've noticed...

    Easy and out of the box hardware support very much matters on the distro. For instance, on Kubuntu, all of my hardware works out of the box. On Fedora KDE, only one of two printers works. The printer that does work has a built in scanner and fax machine, but the scanner does not work. I think part of the goal should be to get all of the drivers properly into the kernel so it's always out of the box support, not only on certain distros. I suspect that in the long run it would save developer time so that they could focus efforts on other stuff.
    Strangely I think Fedora would have a newer kernel than Kubuntu, however the difference in versions should be considered. And if the kernel already supports it, then maybe its something with Fedora itself.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dukenukemx View Post
    Gaming hardware is sound cards and graphic cards? Sound is something I think everyone wants working. Graphics acceleration has become standard in nearly everything. Even FireFox is accelerated. OpenCL would have applications outside of games as well.

    Also, like it or not, people don't go out and buy the latest fastest computer for typing documents and sending out E-Mails.

    You're either....

    A. An artist who's going to need the fastest graphics hardware anyway.
    B. A gamer who wants the best frames per second.
    C. Someone who has too much money.
    Graphics Accelleration works for me. With Free drivers. I don't need OpenGL4 for a wobbely window.

    Creative cards are a no go for anyone who cares about quality. They are gamers cards. I'd prefer an M-Audio Delta any day.

  10. #10
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    Default

    Wouldnt it be simpler to use spdif? Then the cheapest card is enough.

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