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Thread: How to install Ati Catalyst driver on Ubuntu 7.10 “Gutsy Gibbon”

  1. #21
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    I got the driver working now. Actually there wasn't any problem with the install, which I thought it was. I had to execute the line:

    aticonfig max-gart-size=512.

    in terminal. (I have a 512MB graphicscard).

    So the auto-install from the binary-file seems to work now.

    Anyway, I'm very pleased with the new drivers. It seems Compiz works very fine now and the slow performance of Firefox is gone now. *JIPPI* Now I can use Compiz almost all the time. Though videoplaying is a problem. The videooutput is flickering (can it be because Compiz runs in "Indirect Rendering" mode?).

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vantskruv View Post
    I got the driver working now. Actually there wasn't any problem with the install, which I thought it was. I had to execute the line:

    aticonfig max-gart-size=512.

    in terminal. (I have a 512MB graphicscard).
    Which card?

    I have an X1650 256 DDR2 that uses the same setting. The driver and card support virtual RAM. Extending the video storage size using system RAM so the card can store more "stuff".

    So the auto-install from the binary-file seems to work now.

    Anyway, I'm very pleased with the new drivers. It seems Compiz works very fine now and the slow performance of Firefox is gone now. *JIPPI* Now I can use Compiz almost all the time. Though videoplaying is a problem. The videooutput is flickering (can it be because Compiz runs in "Indirect Rendering" mode?).
    Video is an ongoing issue. YOu need to run
    #gstreamer-properties
    Set video to X11 No Xv

    In VLC you need to change the default video output to X11
    Settings -> Preferences -> Video (open menu)
    Check "advanced" box
    Select "output modules"
    Set to X11
    SAVE

    I haven't got xine to work at all, it just crashes X

    You might read more on the xgl and aiglx compositing extentions and make sure you don't have xserver-xgl installed.
    -Tom

  3. #23
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    I have an X1650 256 DDR2 that uses the same setting. The driver and card support virtual RAM. Extending the video storage size using system RAM so the card can store more "stuff".
    I don't *think* we have HyperMemory support in the Linux driver but will check.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by bridgman View Post
    I don't *think* we have HyperMemory support in the Linux driver but will check.
    Would it show up in Catalyst control center?
    I see 256 meg
    405 Mhz memory
    601 Core Mhz
    But no virtual ram.

    I suspect the reason for the "hypermemory" is to move static textures and pixmaps out of expensive vram?

    For my card there is damn little in there. Just some 3D settings that seem to have no effect and verification. But, things change...

  5. #25
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    If it's not in CCC-LE that's a pretty good indication. Not 100% conclusive (sometimes the CCC support might come a release after the underlying support) but in this case I think it's pretty safe to conclude that we aren't doing any HyperMemory stuff in Linux.

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by siggma View Post
    Which card?
    My card is an ATI X1950XTX PCIe

    Quote Originally Posted by siggma View Post
    Video is an ongoing issue. YOu need to run
    #gstreamer-properties
    Set video to X11 No Xv
    I'm running Kubuntu, not Ubuntu. I don't exactly know what gstreamer-properties do, but maybe there is some equal software for KDE?

    Quote Originally Posted by siggma View Post
    I haven't got xine to work at all, it just crashes X
    Xine works fine for me in Kaffeine.

    Quote Originally Posted by siggma View Post
    You might read more on the xgl and aiglx compositing extentions and make sure you don't have xserver-xgl installed.
    -Tom
    I don't have XGL installed, because I didn't like it. When ATI released the new drivers with AIGLX support, I started testing Compiz.



    For the rest, I'm using KPlayer as the standard video player. It's a frontend of mplayer, and I'm very pleased with it. MPlayer and Xine gives the same reactions with the flickering video, though, for now, it works without flickering in fullscreen, but not in window mode. VLC works fine without flickering in window mode, though the performance is bad with poor FPS (but it works fine in fullscreen mode ). Reasons why I'm not using VLC is because of the awkard GUI, problems with subs and no S/PDIF sound, but that's another story.

    Edit: It seems I'm going a little offtopic here, because most of the problems is caused by Compiz...everything works well without Compiz.
    Last edited by Vantskruv; 03-10-2008 at 06:54 AM.

  7. #27
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    Default ATI Cards and shameless plugs

    Quote Originally Posted by Vantskruv View Post
    My card is an ATI X1950XTX PCIe
    Shameless ATI Plug
    I have a similar card. Mine is a Visiontek implementation. I got it repackaged for $139. Not bad for this level of performance, considering the next real step up in performance is three times that cost (DDR3, faster chipset). I've seen and heard things about Nvidia and I purchased one just before I acquired this card but returned it for the X1650. I think it was a GEForce 75xx or 78xx? The ATI card is so much smoother and faster. I'm not sure what it is about Nvidia cards, they seem like a foreign country when it comes to common sense.

    I'm running Kubuntu, not Ubuntu. I don't exactly know what gstreamer-properties do, but maybe there is some equal software for KDE?
    There should be a similar program. It sets the default video mode for the gstreamer engine, which is used by default in all Ubuntu and derivitive installations.


    Xine works fine for me in Kaffeine.
    Are you sure it's using the xine engine?
    Kaffeine, Totem, KPlayer, GMplayer etc., are all front ends for engines. There are several available. Mplayer, Xine, Gstreamer, MythTV and probably others as well. Both totem and kaffeine will use either xine or gstreamer. Kaffeine does them both in a single package. With totem you need to reinstall the package depending on the engine.

    I don't have XGL installed, because I didn't like it. When ATI released the new drivers with AIGLX support, I started testing Compiz.
    No need to have it installed was my point. It's a duplicate and competing product. I think it has priority if it IS installed so with a working ATI setup, it should not be there.


    For the rest, I'm using KPlayer as the standard video player. It's a frontend of mplayer, and I'm very pleased with it. MPlayer and Xine gives the same reactions with the flickering video, though, for now, it works without flickering in fullscreen, but not in window mode.
    Mplayer can be configured using the properties. If my surmise is correct you don't have accelerated video playback either, yet. The best way to get acceptable performance is to set them all to just plain X11 or X11-noXv.

    VLC works fine without flickering in window mode, though the performance is bad with poor FPS (but it works fine in fullscreen mode ). Reasons why I'm not using VLC is because of the awkard GUI, problems with subs and no S/PDIF sound, but that's another story.
    VLC can be made to look very nice if you set the default video output to X11. It's even fairly efficient. I see 12% cpu on a 2140 Core Duo. HIGH considering the processor but not devastating.


    Edit: It seems I'm going a little offtopic here, because most of the problems is caused by Compiz...everything works well without Compiz.
    It's not compiz that's the issue, it's that the driver doesn't support hardware accelerated video playback yet.

    Plus, keep in mind that until recently most video playback was done using an "overlay", a separate hardware accelerated "window " mixed into the output via an chromatic overlay "map", a pure color written to the video playback window that's replaced with the video contents. I think a playback overlay is "mixed" by the monitor drive hardware at the output rather than in RAM. The problem is there's only ONE of me...if you try to watch video with a browser open in the background, the browser typically "locks" the overlay, even if it's not using it forcing your DVD program to use non hardware accelerated output, HIGH Cpu and possibly poor playback. On a slower processor (PIII) you get doggy page loads and choppy, torn poor playback. Now that both Windows and Linux support a composite 3D desktop a new approach to video playback needs to be "developed", and that's what's happening as we banter.

    I suspect the ultimate solution will be to do away with video playback overlays and pack the video card with one, or more, of the following solutions:
    • a reentrant, on chip, firmware driven software video decoder. Expensive because it requires a fast, possibly dual core on-chip proprietary video processor. It basically simulates a software decoder like ffmpeg and outputs to a hardware bounded (gate blocked) VRAM buffer, just like drawing a jpg. Has the advantage that it can decode multiple video streams is VERY flexible and can be easily upgraded.
    • an LSI, programmable hardware gate array decoder which is basically a huge bank of programmable, unclocked logic gates. Expensive to build and tyrannical to program but VERY useful for on-the-fly hardware decoding of both audio and video bit streams. Operates at speeds >= any input stream making it a very forward thinking solution. Usually programmed as a fall-through (as-in write raw stream to port XXXX and it appears in VRAM, all decoded and ready to process for display) decoder. Audio would be sent to an output queue with frame-syc markers embedded. By far the most difficult to implement yet ultimately the most pleasing solution because it basically plays a video for you and can't jam or lock up. Also very secure since you can write a gate program code to the register(s) and only that code will decode the input stream. Can also be used for compression and decompression of a quantized composite media stream.
      LSI Gate Array Trivia:
      Ever heard of a "perplexing register"?
      It's the name of a combination I/O register used to select one of millions of gates and read or write it's contents as a choice "state' such as; AND, OR, NOR, XOR,NOT, IGNOR, PASS, LOCK, UNLOCK, KEEP, etc.
    • in the short term, duplicated hardware decoding similar to the current overlay decoding that supports 4, 8,16, 32 etc video "windows". Limited in how many can be implemented, wasteful of resources, easy to make, expensive. A "patch" while video playback is in transition.
    That's my $1.3134756 worth.
    -Tom

  8. #28
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    Textured Video is hardware accelerated, in the sense that we use GPU hardware (shaders) to perform colour space conversion and scaling and put the result directly into the main framebuffer.

    On older chips the overlay hardware includes CSC and scaling, but the image was kept separate from the main framebuffer and only merged in the display logic.

    The issue here is getting Compiz to pick up the video image generated by the Textured Video shader code and composite it properly. I think that's where the mplayer patch comes in but I'm not sure yet.

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by bridgman View Post
    Textured Video is hardware accelerated, in the sense that we use GPU hardware (shaders) to perform colour space conversion and scaling and put the result directly into the main framebuffer.

    On older chips the overlay hardware includes CSC and scaling, but the image was kept separate from the main framebuffer and only merged in the display logic.

    The issue here is getting Compiz to pick up the video image generated by the Textured Video shader code and composite it properly. I think that's where the mplayer patch comes in but I'm not sure yet.
    Cool, thanks for that explanation. I always keep in mind that my children will see a very different world than I do or will. I suspected the overlay on older cards was mixed at the output since it shows up as a chromatic box if the decoder is jammed. I have an older All in Wonder Rage128 like that. Still plays TV just fine! If only it had pixel shaders...

    As you were saying in earlier posts though, the next generation of hardware is based on current video "viewpoints". Widening and deepening that viewpoint can be very helpful in developing a better working system for the next generation.

    Has there been any talk at all about fully autonomous video adapters?
    -Tom

  10. #30
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    Question

    Thanks for the very clear protocol. I'm a little hesitant to install the ATI catalyst driver for my new HD3850 video card (using ubuntu 7.10, 32 bit). The AMD/ATI site does not list this card as being supported by the newests linux catalyst driver. The HD3850 is listed as being supported by the windows drivers. Any advice on proceeding? Thanks.

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