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Thread: Intel Winning Over NVIDIA For Linux Enthusiasts

  1. #11
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    Dec 2009
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    338

    Default

    I really don't see why people think that the nvidia blob is so great. I have to use it at work on suse 12.1 with an old geforce and a tesla in it and it restarts itself and X multiple times a day...
    Well, maybe others had more luck.

    Oss drivers all the way! (My AMD laptop is more stable than my workstation, go figure.)

  2. #12
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    Mar 2009
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    115

    Default It's not about driver support

    It's not because of driver support, it's because there are no games coming out that are pushing hardware. Just look at Windows, there are no games coming out that justify a $200 video card let alone a $400 one. I've got dual 460gtx graphics cards, but honestly with all settings maxxed at 2560x1600 I only need one card in my system under Windows to guarantee a smooth framerate in any game I can buy right now. There's nothing out there that pushes the hardware. Intel is good enough. The fact that my macbook pro laptop's intel 3000HD gpu can emulate a nintendo Gamecube or Wii properly just illustrates it further. Full 3d hardware acceleration of last generation's gaming console on an integrated GPU. There is a very very small market for fantastically detailed video games now. The entire market has shifted to lower powered consoles and mobile devices with more casual games so it's no wonder that Intel is doing well. It comes on your motherboard, and it Just Works TM. Nvidia/AMD have always had to upsell you on their products. PCs are becoming more off the shelf single units so the high powered gpu vendors are feeling the squeeze. It's why Nvidia in particular have thrown themselves into mobile. The writing was on the wall for PC graphics boards for the last 5 years. PCs "revival" is going to get squashed as soon as the next gen consoles come out in 2013/2014.

  3. #13
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    Jan 2010
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    87

    Default I'm one

    Just ordered a new laptop and I had been thinking about getting one with optimus assuming that things worked now. The recent publicity was enough to make sure I got a machine without Nvidia. (My first two laptops both had Nvidia. My third and fourth now don't.)

    On my desktop I have been all Nvidia for over a decade, usually replacing my card every 18 months or so. I don't remember when I did the last replacement. This has mostly been due to the model numbering as they suddenly started blasting through numbers and letters making it virtually impossible to tell the relative performance of two cards. (eg how much faster is a 200XY compared to 9000XYZ). On my next mobo replacement I am going Intel for the GPU.

    Even on the Android side one needs to be careful. I was very surprised with the Nexus 7 being Nvidia based. I saw some XDA content where they said that TI's OMAP platform is the only one that is all open source drivers. (Contrast with Nvidia and Qualcomm.) So guess what platform any Android devices will be that I buy next.

    Of course it is dangerous to extrapolate from a sample of one, but I do know that I have personally cost Nvidia hundreds of dollars including the above. And that the chances of them getting a cent from me in the future currently looks to be zero.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
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    17

    Default

    I think the dynamics of the general popularity is somewhat interesting as it is a mix of interacting factors.
    The below might hold not only for hardware but for things like distributions as well.

    When chosing a product or project,
    Some chose from a technical point, what company has the 'best' product in benchmarks and such.
    Some chose from a meritocracy point, what company contributes the most to the projects they care about.
    Some chose from an image point, what company seem to be generally alright.
    Some chose from a recommendation point, what company friends and coworkers recommend.
    ... and there are sure to be other viewpoints that I have missed...

    So what is interesting is how the groups effect each other and if this discovered change in the second group will have an effect on the total popularity in the long run.

    I guess some of it depends on if we are willing to speak up and if others are willing to listen...

  5. #15
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    Sep 2008
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    989

    Default

    Awesome chart. Four shades of blue and two shades of red. Hang on; let me get my laptop with the Pantone color sensor to detect the subtle variances that my eyes can't distinguish.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    1,502

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by grotgrot View Post
    Just ordered a new laptop and I had been thinking about getting one with optimus assuming that things worked now. The recent publicity was enough to make sure I got a machine without Nvidia. (My first two laptops both had Nvidia. My third and fourth now don't.)

    On my desktop I have been all Nvidia for over a decade, usually replacing my card every 18 months or so. I don't remember when I did the last replacement. This has mostly been due to the model numbering as they suddenly started blasting through numbers and letters making it virtually impossible to tell the relative performance of two cards. (eg how much faster is a 200XY compared to 9000XYZ). On my next mobo replacement I am going Intel for the GPU.

    Even on the Android side one needs to be careful. I was very surprised with the Nexus 7 being Nvidia based. I saw some XDA content where they said that TI's OMAP platform is the only one that is all open source drivers. (Contrast with Nvidia and Qualcomm.) So guess what platform any Android devices will be that I buy next.

    Of course it is dangerous to extrapolate from a sample of one, but I do know that I have personally cost Nvidia hundreds of dollars including the above. And that the chances of them getting a cent from me in the future currently looks to be zero.
    OMAP isnt all oss. First, there are the pvr drivers, second, the ducati drivers, third, radio.
    Aside from that, I was surprised Goog went with Nvidia again after they were burned with Tegra2. One of the reviews for the Nexus 7 even said that they thiught that the SoC was slightly underpowered for the os.
    The problem, I imagine, is that there are very few choices right now unless you go with something custom and Goog only had four months to bith design and build this.

  7. #17
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    Apr 2012
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    Talking I like this!

    I like to hear that Intel is going ahead, they deserve it. Unfortunately, now they are no match for mid to high-end nVidia and AMD graphic cards, but anyway I like Intel's commitment to linux and open source.
    AMD, go fuck youself for your buggy driver, for no changelogs, for dropping "old" hardware support, for not releasing technical documentation about your cards or releasing it too late, for not helping the users crying on your forum.
    nVidia, go fuck yourself for not realeasing an open source driver, for not helping nouveau guys, for not making your binary blob kms compatible and for not releasing technical documentation about your cards. Since you're not releasing the driver even for ~300 million dollar I think that something is very fishy here, maybe you implemented a backdoor that brings you more than that? Well, fuck you for making me have this thoughs. I like that you're losing money.

    I think that next year with Wayland and systemd and intel's open source driver linux will shine, while Microsoft with their piece of crap Windows 8, nVidia and AMD with their anti-open-source tactics will lose some of their market shares.

  8. #18
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    Dec 2009
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    492

    Default

    Can intel play Oilrush? Imho, nvidia is still in a great place, should gaming on linux ever take off.
    Lately, I've been using linux just for desktop work, but still, with nvidia I get full KDE effect with proper power management.

  9. #19
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    Apr 2011
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    387

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    Quote Originally Posted by bulletxt View Post
    And once again, NVIDIA doesn't care about desktop users. They care about professional Quadro gpus for professional companies at hollywood that use linux to do rendering and all those fancy stuff. And I can do plenty of other examples.

    Nvidia has only engineers, and engineers generally don't give a shit about linux, open source, gpl and all these "socialist" concepts. They do what they are paid for = a good driver for the platform they target.

    All the rest is just "ok, you get even support for geforce because that's fine". I'm still not sure why everyone is unable to understand this.

    Anyways, yes maybe nvidia is loosing market under Linux for the "desktop", but I could reply that there isn't any official Linux desktop market. It's business people.

    Intel on the other hand, has another history on the background and thinks in a different way. But Intel doesn't have the know how NVIDIA has with GPU, so a comparison is pointless.
    Well, Windows and closed source, probably will not exist after 3-5 years. So nvidia must invest on "Socialist/Free".

  10. #20
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    May 2011
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    1,615

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by artivision View Post
    Well, Windows and closed source, probably will not exist after 3-5 years. So nvidia must invest on "Socialist/Free".
    You've gotta be kidding me.

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