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Thread: With Valve On Linux, Has LGP Lost All Relevance?

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  1. #1
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    Default With Valve On Linux, Has LGP Lost All Relevance?

    Phoronix: With Valve On Linux, Has LGP Lost All Relevance?

    Aside from how Valve can better embrace Linux and open-source, another thing to ponder with Valve officially writing about Steam/Source on Linux, is the future of Linux Game Publishing...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTE0MjQ

  2. #2
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    Is there any hope for Linux Game Publishing in its current form?
    No. Why is a company like this even mentioned?

    They've lost their relevance all by themselves, if they even had any to begin with. There's no thanking Valve or any other game company for that. (Keep in mind that Valve's Linux efforts don't yet have any "relevance" either, until the actual games start appearing.)

  3. #3
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    They converted some cool games and I have had loads of fun with Sacred, Shadow and X3. If they come up with a new game I like then I will get it. That has absolutely nothing to do with Valve, Steam, Desura or Gameolith

    totally useless article imho.

  4. #4
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    I've pretty much considered LGP to not exist for the last couple of years. They haven't released anything in several years and there's practically no communication coming out of their offices either. I personally don't expect anything new from them ever again. If they prove me wrong then that's great.

  5. #5
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    I dont see much relevance between steam and LGP. Valve is only going to be able to port their titles and may provide tools and support for helping other developers bring titles to linux. The 3rd party dev's are still going to have to port thier windows D3D code to OpenGL for instance.

    Now I think there is direct competition between Humble Bundle and LGP. HB has really up the standard for ports. They not only provide multiple titles at once, they support many systems i.e macos, no DRM, low cost.
    Hopefully LGP can reinvent themselves and bring more to linux in the future, HB has for certain raised the bar.

  6. #6
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    Games have no relevance, hence game companies (any) also have no relevance.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by droidhacker View Post
    Games have no relevance, hence game companies (any) also have no relevance.
    You are right, the multi-billion dollar gaming market is simply irrelevant. So irrelevant that people funded a game-console project on Kickstarter with over 5 million dollars in the first ten days.
    Really irrelevant.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by droidhacker View Post
    Games have no relevance, hence game companies (any) also have no relevance.

    Isn't that comment a little harsh? There are a lot of people who'd gladly buy a game if it is available for Linux and not all the popular games have been ported for one reason or another

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by droidhacker View Post
    Games have no relevance, hence game companies (any) also have no relevance.
    unfortunatly true.
    linux/gnu is mostly used for work , u can have a few game here and there but as a
    gaming platform its irelevant.

    you can learn howto make them by yourself, everething there : compiler / api ,,,, well its enougth

  10. #10
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    "The old titles from LGP also aren't anything that were even really compelling when originally released, with most Windows gamers likely never even having heard of them, like Gorky 17, Hyperspace Delivery Boy"

    Tis game was created by Monkeystone Games founded by John Romero, Tom Hall, Stevie Case, and Brian Moon:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monkeystone_Games

    "The company was founded in 1991 by four members of the computer company Softdisk: programmers John Carmack and John Romero, game designer Tom Hall, and artist Adrian Carmack (no relation to John Carmack). Business manager Jay Wilbur was also involved."

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Id_Software
    Last edited by gbudny; 07-18-2012 at 02:02 PM.

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