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Thread: KDE 4.9 Is Faster & More Responsive

  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by Prescience500 View Post
    KDE's easily has the most potential among the DE's. If it's few rough edges go away, then maybe we can start geting people to come back to KDE from Gnome.
    It already happened. Many Gnome 2 users decided to switch to KDE rather gnome's hell mess. What's more important Unity is not Gnome, so the most popular environments are Unity and KDE.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by seraphim View Post
    KDE is still far to bloated, sluggish and unstable ...
    As opposed to what? CLI? KDE ran perfectly fine on my laptop with GMA950 3 years ago and it's seen a ton of optimization since then.

  3. #23
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    KDE is nice and all, but it needs to mature a little. They can start by addressing the numerous crashes Gwenview generates on rather simple images (yes, I filed dozens of bug reports - I've never had this happen with Gpicview). Or after I close a random KDE app (especially when the "about" dialog was last displayed), it crashes ungracefully and pops an error message. That alone kills the user experience, especially for new users. I don't know about programming, otherwise I'd help them stabilize these issues myself.
    Last edited by 1c3d0g; 07-20-2012 at 09:45 AM.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by leech View Post
    Unfortunately now Gnome-shell has programmed my brain to utilize the super key to launch the dashboard, so when I try to use KDE or any other Linux DE, it slows me down..

    Anyone know if there still isn't a way to make KDE use that key as a way to open up the launcher?
    I don't think it is possible without ugly hacks. AFAIK Qt only reports that key as a modifier and therefore it cannot be used as a hotkey. Maybe if you mess with raw X and somehow make sure you don't lose any keypresses.

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prescience500 View Post
    I think that most of the people who have issues with KDE being slow don't have enough RAM. That is KDE's biggest flaw. It uses huge amounts of RAM. Last I checked nepomuk slows things down too, but that's easy enough to disable. I'd say that KDE isn't bloated so much as it runs too much all the time. For instance, i don't need or want Akonodi (which consumes a huge amount of the RAM I've mentioned) running if I'm not using Kontact or something. I'd rather have the option to only run these components on demand, not all the time. It opens when I open kontact, it closes when I close kontact.

    Btw, I can't speak for anyone else, but the Quick Access plasma widget is so amazing. I'm so spoiled on it that any time I use any other desktop envirnment, I get really impatient and flustered because I have to go through all of these extra steps to access documents and what not.
    I have a lot of RAM, granted, but I don't find that it uses considerably more RAM than GNOME or Windows (Windows 7 is a real hog). If I only had a gig of RAM, I think it would still run fine. In fact, I ought to do a test and set the kernel command line to limit RAM to 1 gig and see how things run. If you have less than a gig, then yes, KDE will be slow and bloated. Then again, it's 2012. If you have less than a gig of RAM, buy a new computer or just use the lighter-weight, but lower functionality DEs. There's nothing wrong with them. They just don't do as much or look as pretty as KDE.

    I disabled nepomuk and akonadi in my KDE install. They were taking up a lot of resources. Without them running, everything is very snappy. Maybe that's the OP's problem?

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by seraphim View Post
    The only sane desktops for power users and those who want to get work done are Xfce, LXDE and Cinnamon.
    lol, those are poverty desktops

  7. #27
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    I have kde atm running and nepomuk uses only about 25mb ram and akonadi uses about 80mb ram.

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by seraphim View Post
    KDE is still far to bloated, sluggish and unstable to be considered a usable desktop environment. This latest update does nothing to address these flaws. The only sane desktops for power users and those who want to get work done are Xfce, LXDE and Cinnamon. The rest are junk.
    Whatever you say bro.

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alex Sarmiento View Post
    Whatever you say bro.
    Indeed. "Visitors are kindly asked to not feed the trolls. It is for their own good. Thank you in advance."

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by seraphim View Post
    KDE is still far to bloated, sluggish and unstable to be considered a usable desktop environment. This latest update does nothing to address these flaws. The only sane desktops for power users and those who want to get work done are Xfce, LXDE and Cinnamon. The rest are junk.
    If by "bloated" you mean "has features", then yes, it is. :-) LXDE can't even list your most recently used files and programs. This is why Windows users laugh at us. A ZDNet article this week was highlighting distro release candidates and right away a Windows user said of a screenshot showing LXDE, "How did a Windows 95 screenshot sneak in there?"

    I can run KDE 4.7 on a laptop with a 1.8GHZ single core 32 bit Sempron CPU, 512MB of DDR, and a 4200RPM 70GB IDE hard drive. I tried running LXDE and XFCE on it and found a 50MB memory savings at the expense of incredible amounts of functionality. Besides the aforementioned recent files/programs, the LXDE menu had no search function, the file manager paled with the freeware replacement I'd used on Windows XP, and both LXDE and XFCE were anemic compared to KDE in terms of customization. I was unable to reproduce the power settings I had in KDE, and even configuring the touchpad was a nightmare - something as simple as configuring tap to click was very difficult, with one of the two refusing to remember the setting change and needing it to be done again with every boot. Neither had the ability to disable the touchpad while typing, either. The list of simple features that were missing went on and on, let alone missing KDE's advanced features - places/bookmarks accessible from file open/save menus, etc. I found both to be too far backwards for too little gain. If I saw no worthwhile gain on a 512MB antique laptop, I can't imagine why anyone would want to give up KDE on an average desktop.

    I've been using Linux full time for just over 2 years now (as of Wednesday), which means 8+ hours a day of home work use on top of using it on my own time... and since I no longer own a TV, my KDE desktop does double duty as my TV. I've yet to experience this "sluggishness" you speak of, and it's certainly not unstable either - maybe you've only used it on a distro that ends in "buntu"? :-) I assure you I've been getting work done this whole time... data mining, programming, and assorted number crunching and data processing with RapidMiner, LibreOffice, PostgreSQL, SQLite, Free Pascal, Python, R, mathomatic, VirtualBox, GNUCash and others, along with personal use software such as SMPlayer, VLC, XBMC, Banshee, calibre, etc. Today I had a power problem that resulted in the power dropping just quickly enough to cause the system to reboot on two occasions within a half hour and I was very impressed to find that Linux, ext4 and KDE were able to recover very quickly and cleanly to the point you'd barely notice the extra reboot time and there were no anomalies with the desktop once I was back in. Firefox remembered what I was browsing and LibreOffice was able to recover an open file as well.

    KDE is the last of the major desktops that still looks like a desktop and capable of competing (and beating) Windows 7's desktop on features and customizability. I don't think you should be unfairly beating up on it when it's doing an amazing job. The fact that a Windows user can take to it like a fish to water (and discover its own unique features later on) is a definite plus.

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