Page 1 of 7 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 207

Thread: KLANG: A New Linux Audio System For The Kernel

Hybrid View

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    15,636

    Default KLANG: A New Linux Audio System For The Kernel

    Phoronix: KLANG: A New Linux Audio System For The Kernel

    A developer has begun working on a new audio sub-system for the Linux kernel, which he is referring to as KLANG, the Kernel Level Audio Next Generation. KLANG was conceived after the developer became frustrated by ALSA, OSS4, and PulseAudio...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTE1MDc

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    20

    Default

    Seems like something worth trying.

    Right now I can have Jack without Xruns or fancy desktop effects and working power management, never both.

    Best solution for me so far has been a dual install: One with RT or Low Latency kernel, no desktop effects and Jack and one "normal" fancy desktop with decent power management.

    I heard the Mac guys can do both in one system/install...

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    1,765

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ariendj View Post
    Seems like something worth trying.

    Right now I can have Jack without Xruns or fancy desktop effects and working power management, never both.

    Best solution for me so far has been a dual install: One with RT or Low Latency kernel, no desktop effects and Jack and one "normal" fancy desktop with decent power management.

    I heard the Mac guys can do both in one system/install...
    Anyone cares to explain how the Mac people do that and why we cant match it in linux? I don't think mac os x has a RT kernel.
    Last edited by 89c51; 07-31-2012 at 10:01 AM.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Greece
    Posts
    3,801

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 89c51 View Post
    anyone cares to explain how the Mac people do that and why we cant match it in linux? I don't think mac os x has a RT kernel.
    The OS X kernel has RT facilities. But you're missing the point: you don't need RT for this. The reason why RT is used in Linux for audio just shows the problems the audio stack has. RT is not needed, unless you're doing something wrong in the audio infrastructure.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    1,765

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by RealNC View Post
    The OS X kernel has RT facilities. But you're missing the point: you don't need RT for this. The reason why RT is used in Linux for audio just shows the problems the audio stack has. RT is not needed, unless you're doing something wrong in the audio infrastructure.
    Explain whats wrong then.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Greece
    Posts
    3,801

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 89c51 View Post
    Explain whats wrong then.
    NASA launches a rocket carrying a satellite. The rocket explodes 10 seconds after liftoff. 1 billion dollars wasted. Someone says: "It exploded, something went wrong!" 89c51 says: "Explain what's wrong then." Someone answers: "I've no idea!" 89c51 says: "See? Nothing's wrong. Everything is OK."

    89c51 was fired soon after.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    162

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by RealNC View Post
    The OS X kernel has RT facilities. But you're missing the point: you don't need RT for this. The reason why RT is used in Linux for audio just shows the problems the audio stack has. RT is not needed, unless you're doing something wrong in the audio infrastructure.
    Given the fact that the audio subsystem works into userspace,
    if you need a latency around 5ms when the kernel has to process tons of events (interrupts), then you need real time responces for the audio thread and the kernel needs to be preemptible.

    Standard linux can't do it right now, even by tweaking granularity settings:
    http://doc.opensuse.org/documentatio...scheduler.html
    ...and/or givin a process a real time priority RR/FIFO

    So if the video driver at kernel level is interrupt driven, and block it hardly during an effect, the audio skips is perfectly normal.

    Building a preemptible kernel via rt patchsets or having the audio subsystem at kernel level will work.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    66

    Default

    Normally, I'd be interested, but now that we have all these different Linux audio standards this generally feels pointless. The guy does have good points of wanting to put all the audio stuff into the kernel, but is it really that necessary?

    I'm no audio engineer or musician, but isn't PulseAudio doing a fairly good job as far as low latency goes? It had problems when it was first introduced, but not so much anymore from what I understand, and generally many people just seem satisfied with it. It should be good enough for games at least, right?

    And audio engineers, like many others mentioned here, can simply use JACK and a low latency kernel if they need that low of a latency for their stuff.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    20

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 89c51 View Post
    Anyone cares to explain how the Mac people do that [...]?
    I'd like to know that too.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    32

    Default


Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •