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Thread: Apple Thunderbolt Display Presents Problems For Linux

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  1. #1
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    Default Apple Thunderbolt Display Presents Problems For Linux

    Phoronix: Apple Thunderbolt Display Presents Problems For Linux

    For the past few weeks I have been trying out the Apple's Thunderbolt Cinema Display under Linux. While this 27-inch Apple Thunderbolt Display is beautiful and delivers stunning quality, it does illustrate another area where the current Linux hardware support currently comes up short. There's both good and bad news about using a Thunderbolt-based display under your favorite Linux distribution.

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=17717

  2. #2
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    Moral of the story. Don't buy apple products and expect them to work properly out of the box with linux. Give it at least one or two kernel iterations after the introduction of the product.

    Or better don't buy their products at all. That said i understand its hard to resist in shinny things.




    BTW Michael the chair is an HM Aeron right?? Recommended or not?

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    Quote Originally Posted by 89c51 View Post
    Moral of the story. Don't buy apple products and expect them to work properly out of the box with linux. Give it at least one or two kernel iterations after the introduction of the product.

    Or better don't buy their products at all. That said i understand its hard to resist in shinny things.
    Yeah, Linux should never support thunderbolt.

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    Quote Originally Posted by boast View Post
    Yeah, Linux should never support thunderbolt.
    Is that what you understand from my post??


    Quote Originally Posted by frantaylor View Post
    At this point one should probably wait for the USB 3.0 version at the very least.

    If you actually use your computer to earn your income, the extra price for Apple stuff is just irrelevant. An experienced professional computer person is pulling down upwards of $100K per year. If the fancy Apple gear gets the job done with less fiddling around, it's clearly worth it.

    Sure you can stop buying their stuff, if you don't want to participate in a market where the users spend twice as much money on their computers as Windows users. When I see expensive computer gear and high profits, I see opportunities to make money, not "shiny things". They wouldn't participate in the high-value market if it were not reaping huge profits for them. You can also get into this market and charge lots of money if you want to.
    Its not that apple products are not good. They have excellent hardware but they rub me wrong in so many ways. As for getting in the market i would love to have my ideas around computers materialized but sadly i don't have the millions to turn them into actual products.
    Last edited by 89c51; 08-06-2012 at 02:19 PM.

  5. #5
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    Apple ought to add support for their Thunderbolt displays to Linux.
    It would benefit their customers.

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    Quote Originally Posted by uid313 View Post
    Apple ought to add support for their Thunderbolt displays to Linux.
    It would benefit their customers.
    Why?? They simply don't care. Their products are made to be used with Mac OS X. The same thing goes for most -if not all- manufacturers. Their products are made to run Win.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by 89c51 View Post
    Moral of the story. Don't buy apple products and expect them to work properly out of the box with linux. Give it at least one or two kernel iterations after the introduction of the product.

    Or better don't buy their products at all. That said i understand its hard to resist in shinny things.




    BTW Michael the chair is an HM Aeron right?? Recommended or not?
    At this point one should probably wait for the USB 3.0 version at the very least.

    If you actually use your computer to earn your income, the extra price for Apple stuff is just irrelevant. An experienced professional computer person is pulling down upwards of $100K per year. If the fancy Apple gear gets the job done with less fiddling around, it's clearly worth it.

    Sure you can stop buying their stuff, if you don't want to participate in a market where the users spend twice as much money on their computers as Windows users. When I see expensive computer gear and high profits, I see opportunities to make money, not "shiny things". They wouldn't participate in the high-value market if it were not reaping huge profits for them. You can also get into this market and charge lots of money if you want to.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by frantaylor View Post
    At this point one should probably wait for the USB 3.0 version at the very least.

    If you actually use your computer to earn your income, the extra price for Apple stuff is just irrelevant. An experienced professional computer person is pulling down upwards of $100K per year. If the fancy Apple gear gets the job done with less fiddling around, it's clearly worth it.

    Sure you can stop buying their stuff, if you don't want to participate in a market where the users spend twice as much money on their computers as Windows users. When I see expensive computer gear and high profits, I see opportunities to make money, not "shiny things". They wouldn't participate in the high-value market if it were not reaping huge profits for them. You can also get into this market and charge lots of money if you want to.
    Then you wouldn't buy an Apple product at all. You would never buy an Apple product for a non-Apple product, aka Linux.

    People who make money from using computers would see Thunderbolt monitors as useless junk, and would instead buy actual professional non-Apple monitors with display ports that their graphics card supports. People who buy Apple products mainly buy them because they are from Apple, irregardless of price and actual worth. Can you imagine trying to display really high resolution, high quality content with thunderbolt, where graphics isn't being rendered by a dedicated workstation or gaming graphics card?

    You would essentially have to get one of these http://www.tomshardware.com/news/asu...cie,15925.html and by then, what's the point of the extra 'fiddling' and cost when a simple displayport monitor would have did a better job?
    Last edited by mmstick; 08-06-2012 at 02:06 PM.

  9. #9
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    do they make a $2000 version or one that has a finger bone of steve jobs in it? for that I'd be willing to pay $10000 plus my first born

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    Quote Originally Posted by mmstick View Post
    Then you wouldn't buy an Apple product at all. You would never buy an Apple product for a non-Apple product, aka Linux.

    People who make money from using computers would see Thunderbolt monitors as useless junk, and would instead buy actual professional non-Apple monitors with display ports that their graphics card supports. People who buy Apple products mainly buy them because they are from Apple, irregardless of price and actual worth. Can you imagine trying to display really high resolution, high quality content with thunderbolt, where graphics isn't being rendered by a dedicated workstation or gaming graphics card?

    You would essentially have to get one of these http://www.tomshardware.com/news/asu...cie,15925.html and by then, what's the point of the extra 'fiddling' and cost when a simple displayport monitor would have did a better job?
    You're a moron, welcome to Phoronix.

    First off, when trying to sound smart, avoid using made-up and redundant words like "irregardless".

    Secondly through finally, you're probably either still in school or early on in your career (though I'm giving you the benefit of the doubt here, even being able to hold a highish level tech related position). When you grow up a little, you'll see that there are plenty of people making very good livings (myself included) using reliable Apple hardware.

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