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Thread: Digia Buys Out Qt From Nokia

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by GreatEmerald View Post
    125 people? Oh come on, surely they could have bumped the number to 128 and be just that much more classy.
    Pishaw! Well played, sir.


    In my opinion this is simply for the best; I don't trust Nokia one whit after their marriage under the table with Microsoft. Digia cannot possibly be a worse benefactor. Also I really wanted a N950, damn it all. :<


    Quote Originally Posted by DrYak View Post
    It would be nice if Linux distribution which use Qt a lot (for example Suse is mostly KDE based, although it supports other environments) try to poach a few of the remaining developers and put them on their own payroll, just to be sure that Qt on the desktop development stays afloat.
    Not precisely what you're asking for, but this popped up on planetkde a few hours ago;
    Digia acquires part of Nokia’s Qt business
    It was announced this morning that Digia Plc will acquire the “Qt software technologies and Qt business” from Nokia. This ends the recent uncertainty in the Qt community, something that should be beneficial for the Qt ecosystem and the Qt users worldwide, including KDAB’s customers, and hopefully ensures the continuity and sustained funding of Qt development.

    KDAB is the second largest contributor to Qt5 today, and others are also investing heavily. There are some more quite big organizations in the desktop, industrial automation, automotive, IPTV space and elsewhere which are deeply committed to Qt and will contribute to keeping it moving forward. Qt5 is going to be released soon and, in our estimation, provides a great foundation to build on for many years (remember, it is already more than seven years since Qt4 was released, and it is still going very strong). Nokia selling Qt mostly means that their priorities, in particular with respect to their platforms, are less of a concern in Qt development now, while the priorities of organizations that contribute more, such as KDAB and our customers that we support, will gain more weight. Of course, it is also KDAB’s hope and strong expectation that Digia will start contributing more to Qt so that the Qt ecosystem as a whole can move the technology ahead at an unreduced or even increased speed. Digia’s announcement in that respect sounds very promising, something KDAB applauds.

    Qt continues to be the only viable option for cross-platform (Mac, Linux, Windows) development on the desktop, the only viable option for high performance native development of modern applications in the embedded space, both consumer and industrial, and a great foundation for building OpenGL and HTML5 stacks for front-end development using those technologies.

    KDAB is extending both hands to everybody contributing to Qt and hopes for joint efforts to make Qt better than ever. In particular, it is important that as many Qt developers as possible find a new home, even those not part of the deal announced today, and KDAB will attempt to contribute its share to that, too. As for marketing Qt to potential users, ICS and KDAB have already announced that they will host the Qt Developer Conference in California and Berlin this year, and the vast majority of players in the ecosystem are quickly rallying behind that.

    Personally, I have worked with Qt since 1996, and at no time between then and now has there been a more intense and productive development going on in Qt. Qt is embodying so many technologies and platforms these days that it is almost impossible for a single person to keep up with all developments, and it just keeps going on.

    If you have any further questions about this matter, or would like to learn more about how KDAB can help you get the most out of Qt, please do not hesitate to contact us by any of the means listed at http://www.kdab.com/kdab-contact-details/.

    Matthias Kalle Dalheimer
    President and CEO of KDAB
    Disclaimer: I am not affiliated with KDAB in any shape or form. They earn a big tip-of-the-hat from me with that, though.

  2. #22
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    Is the recently fired Qt team from Australia also part of the deal?

    In any case, this is the best possible outcome for Qt. Unlike some would like you to believe, in this world, money does matter, and without some company backing you up, you'll be severely limited in what you can do. Somebody has to pay the bills at the end of the day, whether we like it or not.
    Last edited by 1c3d0g; 08-09-2012 at 01:09 PM.

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by n3wu53r View Post
    You know there are probably limits to what open governance can do. Change the license? WHY? It's LGPL, what mroe do you want?
    Learn to read, retard. I already wrote “LGPLv2 or later” instead of “LGPLv2 only” in the part you quoted and you still ask whether I want the BSD license??? Seriously?!??!?!

    Quote Originally Posted by Jonno View Post
    No, because the Qt Project does not own the copyright. What the Qt Project got from Nokia was the right to name releases "Qt" (eg. a trademark license). I.e. The Qt Project decides what gets to be called "Qt", and could theoretically make a “LGPLv2 or later” release named "Qt", but only if they threw away all old code, which obviously won't happen.
    So, Qt Project could decide to abandon the currently required CLA for all contributors?
    The question was rhetorical: No they can't. Nokia (soon Digia) have full control about how Qt is run and what can go in and what can stay out. The formal structure of Qt Project is democratic, but so is North Korea if you read its constitution.

    Don't get me wrong: I like Qt and Digia is better than MS-puppy Nokia (although KDAB would be even better) but licensing restrictions are the biggest stumbling blocks for outside contributors.
    It's exactly what lead to the LibreOffice fork of OpenOffice.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by 1c3d0g View Post
    Is the recently fired Qt team from Australia also part of the deal?
    Read http://www.digia.com/en/Home/Company...Qt-from-Nokia/

    „As part of the transaction, a maximum of 125 Qt people from Nokia will transfer to Digia, mostly based in Oslo, Norway and Berlin, Germany.

    So not, they won't and other will likely be fired first (eg. Nokia assigned many of its devs in Finnland to work on Qt).

  5. #25
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    And will happen to Qt Creator in this situation?

  6. #26
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    It should be noted that the aforementioned patch delta between Digia's commercial Qt and the open source is not really Digia's fault. Digia submitted the code to Nokia and Nokia is the one who didn't accept it. It would then follow that if Digia now controls open source Qt that the delta should no longer be an issue.

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Awesomeness View Post
    So, Qt Project could decide to abandon the currently required CLA for all contributors?
    The question was rhetorical: No they can't. Nokia (soon Digia) have full control about how Qt is run and what can go in and what can stay out.
    That is not true. The Qt Project has 100% control of what goes into "Qt", and Digia has 100% control of what goes into "Qt Commercial". Of course, it is beneficial for both parties to cooperate, so while the Qt Project is free to drop the CLA requirement, they are unlikely to do so, as that would force Digia to make Qt Commercial a full-fledged fork (rather than a branch) of Qt.

    However, if one day the CLA is seen as hurting more than forcing a fork (e.g. Digia stops contributing to upstream Qt), the Qt Project are free to re-evaluate the use for the CLA.

    Quote Originally Posted by Awesomeness View Post
    It's exactly what lead to the LibreOffice fork of OpenOffice.
    No, what lead to the LibreOffice fork of OpenOffice was that Oracle never handed over the reins to the OpenOffice.org Community Council, which Sun had promised to gradually do. That can not happen in this case, as Nokia already have handed over the reins to the Qt Project, a move Digia will not be able to undo.

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by dalingrin View Post
    It would then follow that if Digia now controls open source Qt that the delta should no longer be an issue.
    Except that Digia don't, the Qt Project does.

    However, the Qt Project is a meritocracy and has a large contingent of soon-to-be Digia employees, so up streaming code from Qt Commercial to Qt proper should become much simpler for Digia once the acquisition is complete.

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jonno View Post
    However, if one day the CLA is seen as hurting more than forcing a fork (e.g. Digia stops contributing to upstream Qt), the Qt Project are free to re-evaluate the use for the CLA.
    That's just fancy talk. Nokia/Digia have almost all votes anyway.

  10. #30
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    In my point of view Digia Buys Out Qt From Nokia only because they are necrolovers.
    Qt is death they do have ZERO relevance in the desktop market and ZERO relevance in the mobile market.
    Mobile is the world of iOS and Andorid and both do not use Qt and the Desktop is the world of Windows,Macos,Ubuntu and not a single one of these popular OS systems use Qt.

    Sorry but the truth is Nokia only sell it because Qt do not have any worth or relevance.

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