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Thread: ZFS File-System On Linux Moves Along

  1. #1
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    Default ZFS File-System On Linux Moves Along

    Phoronix: ZFS File-System On Linux Moves Along

    A new release of the native ZFS file-system module implementation for the Linux kernel (not the FUSE-based ZFS) has been released by the team at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTE2MTc

  2. #2
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    Quick question:
    Sun released version 28 under CDDL, so people can use it. Oracle is now at 30+, which has encryption and stuff, will those features ever be released to the public or are we stuck with version 28? Will there be any kind of fork to develope parallel to Oracle?

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by disi View Post
    Quick question:
    Sun released version 28 under CDDL, so people can use it. Oracle is now at 30+, which has encryption and stuff, will those features ever be released to the public or are we stuck with version 28? Will there be any kind of fork to develope parallel to Oracle?
    i know encryption is planned , tho dont ask for time tho you can use encryption outside the filesystem see http://blog.mthode.org/gentoo-harden...-dm-cryptluks/ at cost of not using the whole disk feature ,which reduces performance a bit .

    i'm running zfs as rootfs for 5 months now and really like it but keep in mind it needs quite some RAM to run smooth

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by disi View Post
    Quick question:
    Sun released version 28 under CDDL, so people can use it. Oracle is now at 30+, which has encryption and stuff, will those features ever be released to the public or are we stuck with version 28? Will there be any kind of fork to develope parallel to Oracle?
    Actually, even FreeBSD ZFS and OpenIndiana ZFS are incompatibles due to parallel developments...

  5. #5
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    ZFS is a losing proposition. The only thing it offers is compatibility with existing ZFS systems for data recovery purposes. Since that will never happen, it would be a lot better to simply forget about it and put all that development resource into enhancing a more viable filesystem, like BTRFS.

    Anything ZFS leaves a bad taste in my mouth. I sure as hell would never use it.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by droidhacker View Post
    ZFS is a losing proposition. The only thing it offers is compatibility with existing ZFS systems for data recovery purposes. Since that will never happen, it would be a lot better to simply forget about it and put all that development resource into enhancing a more viable filesystem, like BTRFS.

    Anything ZFS leaves a bad taste in my mouth. I sure as hell would never use it.
    Why not? I've been using it on production systems where I work for years. It's a fine filesystem, and I trust my data on it. I can't (yet) say that about BTRFS.

    The only real problem with it on Linux is a matter of licensing. I've been running a ZFS pool on my home desktop with ZFS-on-Linux for a while and it seems reliable, although I'm not brave enough to deploy it in production yet.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by droidhacker View Post
    ZFS is a losing proposition. The only thing it offers is compatibility with existing ZFS systems for data recovery purposes. Since that will never happen, it would be a lot better to simply forget about it and put all that development resource into enhancing a more viable filesystem, like BTRFS.

    Anything ZFS leaves a bad taste in my mouth. I sure as hell would never use it.
    As one of the people who contributes to ZFSOnLinux development, I can say the same about btrfs.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by disi View Post
    Quick question:
    Sun released version 28 under CDDL, so people can use it. Oracle is now at 30+, which has encryption and stuff, will those features ever be released to the public or are we stuck with version 28? Will there be any kind of fork to develope parallel to Oracle?
    Solaris is now closed so the Oracle development won't be public (well, except when the code gets anonymously dumped on the internet). The Illumos project (OpenIndiana, Nexenta, etc. -- the OpenSolaris forks) will continue development of the public, open Solaris.

    My understanding is that all the original Solaris devs are focusing on Illumos now... and none of them work at Oracle anymore.

  9. #9
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    Question Help me please

    Hello, firsy excuse me for my bad english, i wokr whit googel traductor.

    I have intallled Linux Mint Debian in first disk and Openindiana ( fork of Solaris ), in second disk.
    I have installed linux ZFS and SPK on the page http://zfsonlinux.org/, according to the manual:

    ZFS:
    $ ./configure
    $ make pkg

    To copy the kernel code inside your kernel source tree for builtin
    compilation:

    $ ./configure --enable-linux-builtin --with-linux=/usr/src/linux-...
    $ ./copy-builtin /usr/src/linux-...

    SPL:
    The simplest way to compile this package is:

    1. `cd' to the directory containing the package's source code and type
    `./configure' to configure the package for your system.

    Running `configure' might take a while. While running, it prints
    some messages telling which features it is checking for.

    2. Type `make' to compile the package.

    3. Optionally, type `make check' to run any self-tests that come with
    the package.

    4. Type `make install' to install the programs and any data files and
    documentation

    But my problem no is solucioned, I can't read syetem Openindian from linux.
    Help me, you know some manual easier? You can read Opensoliaris from Linux?



  10. #10
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    Jun 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by ryao View Post
    As one of the people who contributes to ZFSOnLinux development, I can say the same about btrfs.
    You see, btrfs has made it to mainline. ZFS will never do that - tell "thanks" to guys from Sun for their strange license. The difference? You can see it at post above my. Btrfs will work by default in many distros. ZFS will not. And it will be PITA to use it. So it about to lose their grounds as btrfs improves (and looking on commits to btrfs I can admin it's quite impressive job).

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