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Thread: LanyardFS: A New Linux File-System

  1. #11
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    It kills the stick faster.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by curaga View Post
    It kills the stick faster.
    Guess you should use 'noatime' then, or at least 'relatime' when mounting.

  3. #13
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    relatime has been the linux default for several releases now.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by curaga View Post
    relatime has been the linux default for several releases now.
    So if I don't specify 'relatime' in /etc/fstab, it will still use relatime?
    Even for hard disk devices such as sd[abcd] ?

    My /etc/fstab has relatime for my /dev/sda which is an solid-state drive. Can I remove relatime from /etc/fstab and it still use relatime?

  5. #15
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    It depends on your distro (can be tuned in the kernel config), but the linux default is relatime for all drives.

  6. #16
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    Default mkfs.ext4 -O ^has_journal & noatime

    Quote Originally Posted by uid313 View Post
    Why not use ext4 with journal?
    I actually format the sticks in ext4 WITHOUT journal (-O ^has_journal) which is better than using ext2/3.

    noatime is also a must, and i use it everywhere. I don't care when was the last time i opened a file, those are unwanted writes.
    relatime only delays the writes, noatime is a must to avoid stupid writes when reading files.
    Last edited by Artemis3; 08-20-2012 at 03:14 PM.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by DMJC View Post
    99% of portable devices need to operate with at least one Windows PC or a Macintosh. Until there's an IFS driver for windows and a proper Mac driver, any filesystem released for portable devices is a useless waste of devloper time. All 3 people that are exclusively Linux users are going to use this and everyone else is going to ignore it. If developers want to start pushing their technologies they have to aim for interop. Anything less just isn't acceptable anymore. Especially for low level stuff like Filesystems. We have OpenGL, OpenAL, SDL, and Fat32. Until you're ready to add your filesystem to that reasonably prestigious lineup. You won't get adoption. Linux already has ~50 filesystems most of which are useless outside of their niches due to lack of interop.
    i think you mean 1%, thereis a massive universe of portable/low power/specific devices out there outside your ipod and your digital cam and no one in its right mind is going to write a driver to access the low level infrastructure of a portable/industrial device to start with and this was not designed to replace your pendrive FS either but more for very restrained enviroments like arduino or another ULP arm microcontroller that only need to write small chunks of data before transmit[tcp/rs-232/usb/etc] saving as many cycles as possible, especially in many industrial sensors or servos when ext2/3/4 is like kill flie with a tomahawk missile.

    now on the pc/server market is true i don't see it useful in any way but for the industrial and ULP microcontroller can prove to be useful or at least used as base reference implementation for custom low cycle FS in this devices

    "Linux already has ~50 filesystems most of which are useless outside of their niches due to lack of interop" so?? i don't see the logic in interop at all since each of those fulfill a very different scenario and are not meant to be used for average joe's from the ground up and if you are referring to extX,xfs,btrfs, etc[the desktop/server grade FS] they work perfectly fine in linux, is apple and microsoft decision if they wanna provide support linux with their FS or allow a linux one used in their OS.

    and no microsoft has not help ntfs/fat/etc. outside windows either it was reversed[and i think they tried to sue linux for it]

  8. #18
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    I find that transparent compression a la btrfs is good for flash drives as well as noatime. With transparent compression you read/write less data and the relative CPU time needed to compress/decompress is negligible, even if you use an expensive algorithm like LZMA.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by allquixotic View Post
    I find that transparent compression a la btrfs is good for flash drives as well as noatime. With transparent compression you read/write less data and the relative CPU time needed to compress/decompress is negligible, even if you use an expensive algorithm like LZMA.
    Wouldn't that still be a net negative for changing files?

    ie, change one word in a big text doc. Only that erase block changes.

    If the FS is compressed, that block and all blocks after it would change.

  10. #20
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    *all blocks after it that have the file.

    Editing still broken yada yada.

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