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Thread: Canonical Recently Visited Valve To Talk About Ubuntu

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Czech Republic
    Posts
    175

    Unhappy Let's the hate begin!

    Brace yourself
    Ubuntu haters are coming.

  2. #22

    Question

    Quote Originally Posted by nightmarex View Post
    If Ubuntu does get package manager dependencies Valve would be as good as dead to Linux.
    It seems you're living in some differnt world. If that's the case then, non Ubuntu based distros will be dead. Ubuntu is the most popular Linux right now. Imagine it popularity rapidly grows with games being available.

  3. #23

    Default First impressions.

    Lets hope they convinced Ubuntu kernel-configgers for low-latency as standard.

    See also: http://phoronix.com/forums/showthrea...229#post284229

    Peace Be With you.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    1

    Smile What about spiral knights

    Spiral Knights is a java based game, its running fine under my archlinux.

    Is it possible to send valve an email, because i want see spiral knights in there nativ linux client

    greets Ramonier
    PS: Sry for my bad english.

    Edit: Is there a list of the games that will be released with the client?
    Last edited by Ranomier; 08-31-2012 at 06:48 AM.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Madrid, Spain
    Posts
    399

    Default

    From the article:
    So while some may not be too fond of these companies working with the game studio filled with lots of ex-Microsoft employees.
    To me looks like an ad-hominem. Is Phoronix a strawman creator against Microsoft?
    Isn't it C and C++ created by the greatest corporations of that moment (AT&T)? Isn't Java a part of other big big corporation. Isn't it LLVM part of another big corporation?
    The creator of Java moved to Google, the first TraceMonkey design was in reality a design made for FlashPlayer (ActionScript VM) by Adobe. And as anyone bashes Flash, do not take the reality that a lot of scientific papers (and the outcome in future of the software) is made by big corporations (most of the time).

    Why is relevant that they were ex-Microsoft employees? Means that they were smart enough to pass Microsoft hiring tests, and eventually they enjoyed another career, right? right? Are you not fond to have a smart developer implementing your games?
    Or are ex-Microsoft programmers a "submarine" in Linux? Maybe that's why they left, because they disliked Microsoft.
    I don't want to be defendant of Microsoft, but I consider that many big corporations, technology wise, have a great contribution for what software is today.
    Let's consider 4 things that Firefox that Firefox had and it will have in 2 years time span and all improve interactive games on the web:
    Done:
    - JS: Type Inference - firstly implemented by Google and WeKit's JS, it greatly improved the performance of JS
    - GPU accelerated graphics for Canvas element: IE 9 did it first, and Firefox follows
    Will be done:
    - two level JIT compilation, similar with Sun's HotSpot, and in JS world: latest Google's V8 engine, it will improve high computations kernels (like Kraken JS engine) performance
    - a separate thread to do JS compilation - the 2nd level optimizing compiler, that takes longer time, will compile in parallel the code (done firstly by Microsoft's IE9 and the TraceJIT of Android)
    Most of the times corporations offer better software, and opensource folks catch up. Sometimes they go beyond their parents (Mono's C# Compile-As-A-Service is first it comes to mind), but having the industry setting better standards, make that all of our software to improve. Don't want to be edgy, but VIM had no visible change in the last 5 years (at least me to notice it ) but in fact commercial backed big packages, like Eclipse, IntelliJ IDEA (even they have OSS in their back), Mono they did improve and with them the things we can do with our Linux box.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    349

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by kraftman View Post
    It seems you're living in some differnt world. If that's the case then, non Ubuntu based distros will be dead. Ubuntu is the most popular Linux right now. Imagine it popularity rapidly grows with games being available.
    WTF are you talking about?! I said Valve would be as good as dead to Linux not Linux based distros.

    Ubuntu most popular? It's could be but I don't know about it being king for long. A lot people who want to try a Linux distro are at Mint's doorstep (moot point since it's derived from Ubuntu but then again we don't call Ubuntu "Debian" any more do we?).

    Fhack your statment, Arch/Gentoo/Fedora/Mageia/SUSE...etc desktop users would burn half the world before letting the exclusion of Steam kill their distro. That's not even counting server space you're smoking crack.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Madison, WI, USA
    Posts
    881

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Awesomeness View Post
    If I have to guess I'd say that Steam will have to be installed in the users’ home directory to allow Steam to update itself and all games without asking for admin rights.
    I was thinking more along these lines:
    1) Add a steam user/group to the system
    2) Install Steam to /opt/Steam (or whatever), with all files owned by steam:steam
    3) Set the setuid bit on the Steam executable
    3) Add certain user accounts to the steam group, and make the Steam folder permissions 750.

    When launching Steam, the user will automatically be changed to the Steam user, and Steam can update itself and all of its games without a gksudo prompt. At the same time, you still have the ability to save per-User save games under ~/ and only users who are members of the steam group can run the Steam binary.
    Last edited by Veerappan; 08-31-2012 at 10:38 AM.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    209

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Veerappan View Post
    I was thinking more along these lines:
    1) Add a steam user/group to the system
    2) Install Steam to /opt/Steam (or whatever), with all files owned by steam:steam
    3) Set the setuid bit on the Steam executable
    3) Add certain user accounts to the steam group, and make the Steam folder permissions 750.

    When launching Steam, the user will automatically be changed to the Steam user, and Steam can update itself and all of its games without a gksudo prompt. At the same time, you still have the ability to save per-User save games under ~/ and only users who are members of the steam group can run the Steam binary.
    Yes that's the way to go. Though allowing the $HOME install can be usefull in cases where a user doesn't have admin rights.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    1,599

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Veerappan View Post
    I was thinking more along these lines:
    1) Add a steam user/group to the system
    2) Install Steam to /opt/Steam (or whatever), with all files owned by steam:steam
    3) Set the setuid bit on the Steam executable
    3) Add certain user accounts to the steam group, and make the Steam folder permissions 750.

    When launching Steam, the user will automatically be changed to the Steam user, and Steam can update itself and all of its games without a gksudo prompt. At the same time, you still have the ability to save per-User save games under ~/ and only users who are members of the steam group can run the Steam binary.
    Of course, you have to consider the DRM involved here.

    While the client program might be shared, the games aren't. So one user couldn't update for another.

    I suspect they'll repeat whatever mechanism they use on Windows and OS X.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    158

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by johnc View Post
    Of course, you have to consider the DRM involved here.

    While the client program might be shared, the games aren't. So one user couldn't update for another.

    I suspect they'll repeat whatever mechanism they use on Windows and OS X.
    Actually, the data for the games is shared, it's kept in a "common" folder inside of steamapps, saves and the like are kept in the users own folder. So if one user updates a game, it should be updated for all users.

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