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Thread: Unigine Gets Overhauled, Takes On Latest GL Features

  1. #1
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    Default Unigine Gets Overhauled, Takes On Latest GL Features

    Phoronix: Unigine Gets Overhauled, Takes On Latest GL Features

    Unigine, one of the most impressive multi-platform 3D engines, is now even more impressive after its engine and renderers have received another round of new features, optimizations, and other improvements. Unigine is now already taking advantage of features presented by the latest specifications for OpenGL and OpenGL ES...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTE3ODU

  2. #2
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    I hope they have finally learned how to use GLSL and its #version and #extension directives, so that Mesa doesn't have to add app-specific workarounds for them again.

  3. #3
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    It would be nice if these improvements made their way into Oil Rush. But afaik, the previous round didn't, so I'm not holding my breath this time around either.

  4. #4
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    Seeing that screenshot reminds me of DayZ. Imagine how awesome DayZ could look like with the Unigine engine!

  5. #5
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    Unigine Corp has yet to provide an update when Unigine Valley will be publicly released,
    If they don't have a Sasquatch with scenery like that somewhere I'll be extremely disappointed.

  6. #6
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    Why Unigine is so unpopular in game developer circles when its creators claim its superiority and low price? Something is wrong when devs choose Unity for Linux support when this support only in a state of baking.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
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    Question

    Quote Originally Posted by chelobaka View Post
    Why Unigine is so unpopular in game developer circles when its creators claim its superiority and low price? Something is wrong when devs choose Unity for Linux support when this support only in a state of baking.
    Easy answer:
    You get a free light version of Unity3D with which you can do like everything, even sell games. The Pro version costs about $1500 per developer.
    Unigine costs around $30000 per project.
    So you would need 30000/1500 = 20 developer to compensate this price.
    An Indie studio doesn't have so many developer.
    Even those bigger studios crowedfunding on kickstarter and those alike are not 20 devs.

    Not to mention that you can do more then one project with one Unity3D Pro license.

    Also not to mention the also freely available documentation and lots of tutorials and snippets for Unity3D while there is just some hidden intern stuff for Unigine.


    The Linux part in Unity3D that now everyone is praising and willing to put out for there games is just a marketing gag.
    The export for different platforms in Unity3D is really simple. Now that Unity3D gets Linux output (which is not that hard to provide considering the technologies it's build on, like Mono, C#, JS, OpenGL) every little studio can easily put out their games on Linux.
    If those Linux support wouldn't be in, they probably still would have used Unity3D but no hype on the Linux people would have been.


    Proof?
    The Unity3D Editor still doesn't run native or in Wine on Linux. And there is nothing said about it being able to do so with version 4. So devs will need to do stuff on Windows or Mac. They don't care about Linux else they would have taken another engine (a lot listed here: http://www.devmaster.net/engines/). If I care about Linux I would run it and then I also would like to dev on it. So I choose my tools according to my platform. Those people don't.



    So: Why choosing Unigine?
    Little studios don't have the money and won't get crow-knowledge as with Unity3D and UDK.
    Studios which care about Linux already are using different engines like HPL by Frictional Games or DarkPlaces and id Tech 4 by Kot-In-Action.
    Bigger studios are using less Unity3D and more UDK because of e.g. features. There is also CryEngine for free.
    And the next step are inHouse engines which are used by even bigger studios.




    One big question:
    Why should someone use Unigine?

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