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Thread: CompuLab Intense-PC

  1. #1
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    Default CompuLab Intense-PC

    Phoronix: CompuLab Intense-PC

    Following in the success of the Fit-PC2 NetTop and Tegra 2 Trim-Slice, the latest computer out of CompuLab is the Intense-PC. The CompuLab Intense-PC is a very small form factor (19 x 16 x 4 cm), low-power, fan-less computer that features up to an Intel Core i7 Ivy Bridge processor, 16GB of DDR3 system memory, and a solid-state drive for storage. The Intense-PC is also available with Linux Mint pre-loaded as the operating system.

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=17856

  2. #2
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    Default Power consumption?

    Very interesting device.. Power consumption tests would be useful, I hope these will be included in an upcoming test...thanks

  3. #3
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    while this device seems pretty cool and I have no gripes with it, I don't know about all of you but an i7 running on passive cooling? it's stuff like that why intels marketing is a complete failure and always has been. Intel never seemed to do a good job at naming anything except the original pentium, celeron, Xeon, and Centrino. Everything else either took no thought process or, like in this situation, makes no sense at all.

    Seriously what qualifies the CPU in this system as an i7?

  4. #4
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by schmidtbag View Post
    while this device seems pretty cool and I have no gripes with it, I don't know about all of you but an i7 running on passive cooling? it's stuff like that why intels marketing is a complete failure and always has been. Intel never seemed to do a good job at naming anything except the original pentium, celeron, Xeon, and Centrino. Everything else either took no thought process or, like in this situation, makes no sense at all.

    Seriously what qualifies the CPU in this system as an i7?
    It's the CULV i7. Highest clock in the 17w package, (1.9GHz, 3.0 Turbo)

    Features hyperthreding, virtualization. AES-NI, HD4000 Graphics. The best you can get in that thermal envelope.

  5. #5
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    Seriously what qualifies the CPU in this system as an i7?
    It isn't artificially crippled wrt features, and as such can command the i7 price tag.

    The best you can get in that thermal envelope.
    Technically there are 17w Trinitys too, in that dark corner over there crying

  6. #6
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    Default

    Actually he's right. That i7 is the best you can get at 17w. The AMD E2-1800 has a TDP of 18w

    Oh, there is the A6-4455M from AMD at 17w, but for some reason it doesn't have a desktop version, weird.
    Last edited by Ansla; 09-10-2012 at 12:56 PM.

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    "made in israel"

    I'll pass

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pallidus View Post
    "made in israel"

    I'll pass
    ...why? so what if it's made there. I'm sure your computer or phone has some major parts made in china which is more to worry about since they work for lower wages under a government that doesn't care about employees or quality control. I believe kinect was developed by israelis.

  10. #10
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    I don't own a kinect, I have used one and it gets quite boring after the novelty wears off.

    Most of my computers are quite old and some were even assembled in EU and US (with parts made in taiwan/korea/china I know). In the 90's some brands like 'digital' and 'siemens', hell I even remember the apple lcII we had here and that was made in the us, they didn't outsource to china, it's only in the past 20 years that everything has been made in china

    And yes, the chinese government is just as brutal and cut throat (if not even more so) than the israelli one.

    But 1- Passive cooling is never a good idea, no matter if you think it looks good. Get some flowing air or liquid or something because there's a point where metal saturates with heat.

    2- They are really expensive for the hardware they have, for the same price I could buy a full fledged laptop.

    3- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rachel_Corrie

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