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Thread: Wayland Gets A Native Terminal Emulator

  1. #1
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    Default Wayland Gets A Native Terminal Emulator

    Phoronix: Wayland Gets A Native Terminal Emulator

    The latest achievement within the Wayland camp is wlterm, a native terminal emulator...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTE5Mzc

  2. #2

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    BO$$

    There are native terminal emulators for Wayland, no?

    Michael:

    Screenshots would be nice.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by BO$$ View Post
    I haven't slept in 2 days and I can't focus, but why do we need this again?
    Because xterm doesn't run.

    Or do you mean "why do we need a terminal"?

  4. #4
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    from the mailing list:
    You may wonder why wlterm is needed? There are several reason why I wrote it:

    1) We need more independent clients written from scratch that try to
    find bugs in the wayland-client API. If we use toytoolkit all the
    time, we will probably not find them. wlterm draws its own decoration
    and does not depend on any demo-code from the weston repository. So
    its nice to check whether new weston features are working and how they
    behave. The more independent implementations we have, the better
    testing we get.

    2) I use it to test the TSM library. TSM is a terminal-emulator state
    machine that parses vt220/xterm control-sequences. It has no
    dependencies at all and does not perform any rendering. It is solely
    to parse and interpret CSI/OSC/etc. sequences. There is no such
    library out there so I created TSM (which is already shared between
    wlterm and kmscon). Other libraries like libvte have huge X, Gtk, Qt
    etc. dependencies (sadly). And Kristian asked me whether it makes
    sense to also share it with weston-terminal. Keep in mind that
    weston-terminal does interpret only a small subset of xterm
    escape-sequences and no-one really wants to maintain/develop a full
    parser in weston-terminal (or is someone working on that?).

    3) Get a proper and maintained emulator for weston. I intend to
    maintain wlterm together with kmscon (but both will remain independent
    from each other). So feel free to file bugreports, feature-requests or
    happy-user-feedback. I am open to suggestions. But I am a horrible
    designer so don't expect it to be fancy. I rather work on
    functionality than on beautiful decorations. I will also keep the
    "master" branch a "stable" branch so you can expect it to always work
    and to contain no experimental features (no guarantee, though).

    4) To get more insight into wayland protocol internals. As I am
    working on man-pages for libwayland, I wrote the small fake-toolkit
    from scratch to get a better feeling. I can recommend this to
    everybody who wants to get more knowledge on how it works. And to
    everybody who wants to contribute to the man-pages...

  5. #5
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BO$$ View Post
    I haven't slept in 2 days and I can't focus, but why do we need this again?
    We don't. It's not for end users. The article failed to mention that.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by birdie View Post
    BO$$

    There are native terminal emulators for Wayland, no?

    Michael:

    Screenshots would be nice.
    There is one in the "Downloads" section of wlterm:
    http://cloud.github.com/downloads/dv...con/wlterm.png

  7. #7
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    Regardless of the reasons developers have for writing whatever it is their writing, and regardless of what it's intended to be used for, there seems to be this cancer in the Open-Source community about coming up with the worst possible names for things.

    Now, we have another name that is difficult to remember, and distinguish from others. For example, we already had: eterm,xterm, xiterm, pterm, roxterm, kterm, uxterm, mlterm, fbterm, jfbterm, kxterm. Now we also have wlterm.

    And we wonder why people have difficulty distinguishing between the various projects and packages... Come on guys, rather choose names like Guake, Konsole, Putty. Hell, call it Barbie if you want to. But, PLEASE, let's start moving away from this horrible convention of using acronyms to name things.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by StephanG View Post
    Regardless of the reasons developers have for writing whatever it is their writing, and regardless of what it's intended to be used for, there seems to be this cancer in the Open-Source community about coming up with the worst possible names for things.

    Now, we have another name that is difficult to remember, and distinguish from others. For example, we already had: eterm,xterm, xiterm, pterm, roxterm, kterm, uxterm, mlterm, fbterm, jfbterm, kxterm. Now we also have wlterm.

    And we wonder why people have difficulty distinguishing between the various projects and packages... Come on guys, rather choose names like Guake, Konsole, Putty. Hell, call it Barbie if you want to. But, PLEASE, let's start moving away from this horrible convention of using acronyms to name things.
    +1

    The acronym-ish names are getting REALLY annoying and just a pain to say in conversation (yes some FOSS users actually have to SAY these names not just type them where its easier) Konsole? Great name. Guake? Awesome. Yakuake? ....less awesome but atleast its not an acronym. Wine? An acronym but atleast you can say it in normal conversation.

    LETS HAVE NICE NAMES!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    11

    Default Nice.. Relative..

    Nice seems somewhat relative, and many would argue acronyms are used to help people remember. wl-term (wl = wayland, term = terminal) not that tough pretty simple (along with all the others), get over yourself. Obvioulsy you would have to make a complaint to the OpenSource marketing team ahead of such projects to chose a better name then what the developers do.. wait there isn't one, it's volunteer work.. huh
    Last edited by jmiahman; 10-01-2012 at 11:49 AM.

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