Results 1 to 10 of 12

Thread: LLVM/Clang vs. GCC On The Intel Atom With Linux

Hybrid View

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    14,820

    Default LLVM/Clang vs. GCC On The Intel Atom With Linux

    Phoronix: LLVM/Clang vs. GCC On The Intel Atom With Linux

    For those curious how LLVM/Clang compares against the GCC compiler on low-end x86 hardware, here's some numbers...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTE5OTM

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    275

    Default nothing exciting

    Interesting article, none the less. Thanks Michael!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    1,946

    Default

    Any proprietary Apple-only LLVM extensions so far?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    275

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by crazycheese View Post
    Any proprietary Apple-only LLVM extensions so far?
    I doubt it will ever happen. I am no lawyer, does BSD license permit changing of once derivate works into different license? If anything, can this software be "converted" into GPL3?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    26

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by dimko View Post
    I doubt it will ever happen. I am no lawyer, does BSD license permit changing of once derivate works into different license? If anything, can this software be "converted" into GPL3?
    Yes, BSD basically allows everything, the only thing you have to do is include the copyright notice. (That's what all these GPL vs BSD here discussions are about)

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    330

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Goderic View Post
    Yes, BSD basically allows everything, the only thing you have to do is include the copyright notice. (That's what all these GPL vs BSD here discussions are about)

    Not at all. When you have some BSD code inside your GPL program, this code remains BSD. So even if someone take that part of your source, he isn't forced to open his source (that's the discussion here), and also the next release of a program can be closed. So basically BSD doesn't protect the free programmer and can't be converted to GPL. All the above doesn't mean that BSD isn't useful. Actually the best thing is LLVM to remain BSD, so that companies will compile their C++ programs and games with LLVM and be Instruction_Set free. Another good thing with BSD is that there are not patents. So if you implement the LLVM technology in the next portable GCC (5 for example), with your own code, then it will be a GPL GCC5_vm, with LLVM binary compatibility.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •