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Thread: The Linux 3.7 Kernel Is Going To Be A Beast

  1. #11

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    Wii Fit board support! Woot!

    (...now what the frak am I actually going to do with it...?)

  2. #12
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    Weigh yourself, foot controlled pointer (accessibility), pressure sensitive switch for alarm system to differentiate between pets and humans, advanced feature rich whoopy cushion, etc.

  3. #13
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    Nov 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by halfmanhalfamazing View Post
    Why don't people set up separate /home partitions?

    I've always done this, and from what I experience this whole "rolling distribution" vs "non-rolling distribution" is a nonsensical argument.

    Format the / partition, and when the "new" operating system comes up after installation it inherits all of the prior settings that still reside in /home. It takes minutes to select the various apps I use, and the let the computer do all the work installing. Done. Now I'm on the "new" operating system, and it's a clean install which is good to do every now and then anyways.

    What am I missing?
    Some things you're missing is that:
    1. Not all settings are stored in /home.. think /etc
    2. Having to install a new OS every few months is not the same as continuously updating packages.

  4. #14
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    Nov 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by tancrackers View Post
    I never have issues with Arch. I really wonder what people do to their installations...

    And new kernels are a must-have for those of us with new computers. When I made the jump from 3.1 to 3.4 in opensuse (before I used arch), it was a night a day difference.
    Yeh, I guess I like to kick the tyres around I do enjoy pulling it back from the brink to full working order though... I do find the way systemd just locks at boot, with the slightest configuration error, somewhat annoying though...

    Personally I was set with the Ubuntu 10.04 kernel - since it was the first kernel (2.6.32 or something) that fully supported SATA port-multipliers for my Server. I would give up newer kernels for more development money thrown at Wine - in a heart beat... But then I then to sit on older hardware (a core i7 920 Nehalem-based system is my newest kit just now).

    Bob

  5. #15
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    Aug 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by tancrackers View Post
    I never have issues with Arch. I really wonder what people do to their installations...

    And new kernels are a must-have for those of us with new computers. When I made the jump from 3.1 to 3.4 in opensuse (before I used arch), it was a night a day difference.
    No issues? Do you use twm with vesa or no window manager and plain console? Still there would be issues ..
    Or having to reconfigure stuff etc after every few updates does not count?
    I recall once it randomly stopped booting with kernel panic, good thing I was too lazy to remove my failed self compiled kernel .. So I had something that could at least .. boot ..
    Arch is also unusable to me without unofficial packages(be it unofficial repos, AUR or something else), which are, according to Arch developers, bound to cause problems.
    It's cool and all. but needs you to try to tame it all the time.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rigaldo View Post
    Arch is also unusable to me without unofficial packages(be it unofficial repos, AUR or something else), which are, according to Arch developers, bound to cause problems.

    It's cool and all. but needs you to try to tame it all the time.
    Pretty much EVERY arch user has packages pulled from an unofficial repo or the AUR, its just how it is. Its not like the other distros where if you pull in unofficial packages you're breaking some sacred maxim-- the arch developers themselves probably pull in packages from the AUR they warn you that they CAN cause problems because they can but that doesnt mean "DONT! TURN BACK!" it means "Dont be stupid, be careful."

    ~Happy Arch user~

  7. #17
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    Sep 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rigaldo View Post
    No issues? Do you use twm with vesa or no window manager and plain console? Still there would be issues ..
    Or having to reconfigure stuff etc after every few updates does not count?
    I recall once it randomly stopped booting with kernel panic, good thing I was too lazy to remove my failed self compiled kernel .. So I had something that could at least .. boot ..
    Arch is also unusable to me without unofficial packages(be it unofficial repos, AUR or something else), which are, according to Arch developers, bound to cause problems.
    It's cool and all. but needs you to try to tame it all the time.
    I run gnome-shell with a pure systemd setup and a plymouth splash image.
    I have 33 AUR packages installed. I have no issues.

  8. #18
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    Dec 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by bobwya
    Probably better to be non-rolling than my Arch install that bricks itself every month - till I fix it manually!!
    I must be one of those strange cases that have no problem whatsoever with Arch. Same installation for the last 3 years. A couple of situations where i had to fix some problems when major changes occurred (well explained and documented on the arch linux site or the forums)

    Quote Originally Posted by bobwya
    I do find the way systemd just locks at boot, with the slightest configuration error, somewhat annoying though...
    I've been using SystemD for more than 2 years now. Although it's true that at the beginning it was a bit of a pain in the ass, it's been in a rock solid state for more than a year and a half. And of course this is Arch, you are going to have to configure your system so if you make mistakes like with everything else it'll go wrong. You read (what you should have done before and not after), you fix them, you learn, you don't make them again, and then everything goes more smoothly than you'll ever find on Bugbuntu. And you just don't go back.

  9. #19
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    Mar 2011
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    When we switched to mkinitcpio that one did it, until then I never had a major hiccup. I no longer use grub since that seemed to be the thing that went awry most often .The AUR is an amazing tool and I don't know why other distro's don't have an unofficial user maintained alt package base like this.

  10. #20
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    Nov 2010
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    Cool Way, way OT!! What has this to do with a new kernel release in fact!! NOTHING!!

    Quote Originally Posted by Viper_Scull View Post
    I must be one of those strange cases that have no problem whatsoever with Arch. Same installation for the last 3 years. A couple of situations where i had to fix some problems when major changes occurred (well explained and documented on the arch linux site or the forums)

    I've been using SystemD for more than 2 years now. Although it's true that at the beginning it was a bit of a pain in the ass, it's been in a rock solid state for more than a year and a half. And of course this is Arch, you are going to have to configure your system so if you make mistakes like with everything else it'll go wrong. You read (what you should have done before and not after), you fix them, you learn, you don't make them again, and then everything goes more smoothly than you'll ever find on Bugbuntu. And you just don't go back.
    One of the reasons I use ARCH and Gentoo is because it gives me a kick up the arse to delve into the depths of how a Linux Desktop system is configured. I personally find most Ubuntu-derived distros to be a bit boring. However I currently run about 7-8 distros (on bare metal) in a multi-boot configuration to compare how they do things. I like to remain distro agnostic!

    If you've been using systemd this long then perhaps you should be made aware it should be written "systemd" (correction I received some months ago from the ARCH systemd maintainer!!) - "SystemD" is not the correct name...

    BTW I've had my ARCH install switched over to systemd for about a year. So I've given it a fair go before feeling I could comment (either way) on the relative merits of Init-V vs. systemd (Upstart will die some day soon like Compiz). Some people seem to feel able to dimiss systemd without even testing it all... In fact I did try and offer some fixes to the BASH completion script for systemd about 9 months ago... However I just got the brush off by the guy who does the ARCH systemd packaging... Not very community spirited IMHO...

    Actually I read most of the ARCH and Gentoo Wiki pages in great detail (both are a bit lite on systemd detail IMHO). However my fstab get a bit complicated (as you can imagine!!) One little slip and a systemd-based system won't boot. That's just a fact - and is no fault of ARCH - it's simply how it's written. Perhaps there is simple switch so it doesn't just hang during boot - on a minor system configuration error (e.g. mountpoint for a non-critical FS partition does not exist). But not even dropping to a TTY console (like Init-V generally manages to do) - to do some quick repair work - is really unnecessary...

    Also I thought systemd would magically/on demand mount remote CIFS fmountpoints from my fstab file when I went to access them... However this is not how the lazy mounting works sadly... Personally I don't care so much about fast boot speeds (I boot of a Sammy 830 SSD after all). After boot KDE takes care of any speed gains I might have gained from systemd



    Bob
    Last edited by bobwya; 10-07-2012 at 08:04 PM. Reason: rweregerger

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