Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 27

Thread: Samsung Introduces New Linux File-System: F2FS

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    799

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by dnebdal View Post
    This is for flash with no wear-leveling (like you might find in cheap embedded devices), not an SSD.
    I never heard of anyone running into problems because his router wrote to much data to often to its flash storage.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Linuxland
    Posts
    5,186

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by blackout23 View Post
    Trying to maximize flash lifetime is a worthless effort. Try writing a SSD to death withing 10 years.
    http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/...e-25nm-Vs-34nm

    No one is ever going to write that much on an SSD on a daily basis that you exceed 1 PB host write.

    A very common SSD (Crucial M4) has surpassed 750 TB host write. Spread it over 10 years (3650 Days) and you'd have
    to write over 200 GB (the drive itself will have either 128 or 256 GB capacity) per day every day for 10 years and it will still function.
    SSDs can take a lot of shit contrary to popular belief.
    I've killed several USB sticks. All any SSD is is just a RAID of USB sticks, to put it in common words.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Linuxland
    Posts
    5,186

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mark45 View Post
    Well frankly, sometimes it's even worse, it might take 3-4 seconds to delete a few files worth of like 6GB, while on a window$ system it takes less than a second to do the same thing, often in a blink of an eye.
    If your workload consists of often deleting big files, you should check the benchmarks and pick a FS more designed for that. Not to mention tune it for it.
    The default FS is more tuned to small files and the usual day-to-day work.

    (JFS and XFS are the usual recommendations for handling big files, but do benchmark.)

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    492

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by blackout23 View Post
    I never heard of anyone running into problems because his router wrote to much data to often to its flash storage.
    Think about memory in a smartphone and kids updating their FB accout every hour...
    Plus, with the transition from 3x nm to 2x nm, flash P/E cycles took a nose dive. From 10k to 3-5k. Who knows how things will be in the future?

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    799

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by curaga View Post
    I've killed several USB sticks. All any SSD is is just a RAID of USB sticks, to put it in common words.
    It isn't. USB Sticks certainly don't use MLC NAND or even SLC NAND. They use cheaper Flash chips and inferior controllers.
    Last edited by blackout23; 10-05-2012 at 11:28 AM.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    San Bernardino, CA
    Posts
    232

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by curaga View Post
    Unlike lanyardfs, this one actually has a point. It'll maximize the life of the flash.

    btrfs will not do that. Any generic fs will not do that.
    Exactly. For those asking why we need YAFS (Yet another file system), this filesystem is highly tuned to the nuances of NAND flash (think Smartphone or Tablet FS). In addition to extending life, it is tuned/optimized to deliver consistent performance on NAND flash filesystems that are in widespread use today. Linux really has been lacking a filesystem tuned to the specifics of NAND flash, and this fills the gap. Thanks Samsung!

  7. #17
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    1,559

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by blackout23 View Post
    I never heard of anyone running into problems because his router wrote to much data to often to its flash storage.
    Samsung is the world leader in flash technology.

    Why would they spend money on this if they didn't think it was worthwhile?

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    1

    Default this is my first post. <3

    just what android needs. a new filesystem for those cheap flash storage inside the phones and tablets, some of them aren't even extendable. SSD is a very different case since the controller chip itself have a mechanism to *minimize* wear and tear, thus needing the filesystem to only support the features such as TRIM to work properly, that is why there's no need to have a proper filesystem made for them.

  9. #19

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by blackout23 View Post
    I never heard of anyone running into problems because his router wrote to much data to often to its flash storage.
    A temperature monitoring device died on me because of that exact problem. It used up the writes on its flash, and it quit working one day.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    8

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by blackout23 View Post
    It isn't. USB Sticks certainly don't use MLC NAND or even SLC NAND. They use cheaper Flash chips and inferior controllers.
    You do realize that NAND is a type of flash memory, right? (There's also NOR flash, which is commonly used when direct addressing is required, e.g. BIOS ROMs.)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •