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Thread: Doom 3 BFG Approved For GPL/Open-Source

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    Default Doom 3 BFG Approved For GPL/Open-Source

    Phoronix: Doom 3 BFG Approved For GPL/Open-Source

    id Software released "Doom 3 BFG Edition" this week, a revised version of the Doom 3 game that came eight years after the original release of Doom 3. The engine source-code for Doom 3 BFG, which is still a modified id Tech 4 engine, is already approved for open-sourcing...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTIxMDc

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    Would be interesting if it still works with old pk4 files.

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    Default Backports

    Hope it contains some backports from id Tech 5.

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    With companies like Valve and others starting to warm up to Linux, who cares that ID is not porting stuff... ID games were great when they were young, but lately, they have been.... well, quite lacking - Rage anyone?

    John Carmak can go play his own games with himself! Windows is diminishing with the demise of the PC market anyway, so, quite frankly, who gives a crap!

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    Quote Originally Posted by uid313 View Post
    Hope it contains some backports from id Tech 5.
    I watched a little bit of the last Quakecon Carmack keynote on youtube, and I believe he said that they backported the id Tech 5 netcode into the Doom 3 BFG edition. Don't have a link handy to back that up off hand, but googling for it shows some results at least.

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    Quote Originally Posted by LinuxRocks View Post
    With companies like Valve and others starting to warm up to Linux, who cares that ID is not porting stuff... ID games were great when they were young, but lately, they have been.... well, quite lacking - Rage anyone?

    John Carmak can go play his own games with himself! Windows is diminishing with the demise of the PC market anyway, so, quite frankly, who gives a crap!
    So far id software have done a lot more to support the open source community then Valve ever have. I don't recall Valve ever releasing any of their engines under the GPL.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kamikaze View Post
    So far id software have done a lot more to support the open source community then Valve ever have. I don't recall Valve ever releasing any of their engines under the GPL.
    Oh, I totally agree with you... But, for Linux specifically, Valve is the only one that even acknowledges Linux as a viable platform to use for gaming. John came out and bluntly stated that Linux was NOT an option for gaming. So, from an open source standpoint, you are correct.

    However, Open source is not only Linux!

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    Quote Originally Posted by LinuxRocks View Post
    Oh, I totally agree with you... But, for Linux specifically, Valve is the only one that even acknowledges Linux as a viable platform to use for gaming. John came out and bluntly stated that Linux was NOT an option for gaming. So, from an open source standpoint, you are correct.

    However, Open source is not only Linux!
    Yes, true and I am also looking forward to what Valve can do for Linux.

    I also think id will change their tune re- Linux as a viable platform once it's shown to them how much it has grown since they last released a game on the platform!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kamikaze View Post
    Yes, true and I am also looking forward to what Valve can do for Linux.

    I also think id will change their tune re- Linux as a viable platform once it's shown to them how much it has grown since they last released a game on the platform!
    Hey, speaking of Valve, has anyone been invited to the private beta? I put in my name and e-mail, but never heard back.

    Just curious.

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    Quote Originally Posted by LinuxRocks View Post
    Oh, I totally agree with you... But, for Linux specifically, Valve is the only one that even acknowledges Linux as a viable platform to use for gaming.
    Valve isn't "acknowleding" that Linux is a viable gaming platform quite so much as "really really hoping" that it is. Valve is simply trying every last possible thing it can do to avoid the eventual irrelevancy of Steam in a post-Window-8 PC marketplace. Sure, it'll be years and years most likely before Steam ceases to be the primary distribution platform for PC games, but the day is now known to be coming for sure. Heck, given that most gamers will be skipping Windows 8 and waiting for the next "desktop edition" Microsoft OS, Steam probably has another 5+ years of domination on the PC front, but Gabe's cashflow starts to look pretty gloomy after that.

    Also remember that Valve is already losing some ground as the bigger, higher-volume, higher-sales companies (Activision-Blizzard and EA) are avoiding Steam more and more and moving towards their own distribution channels (which are also threatened by the Windows Store, of course), in addition to the cannibalization of the "real games" market by cheap iOS games in the current recession. They're already feeling the pressure of competing app stores, and Windows 8 isn't even out in most consumers' hands yet.

    Steam fading away is not at all a bad thing, either. For all the doom and gloom of the walled ecosystems of Apple/Microsoft and their respective stores, Steam is a far worse walled garden with worse deals for developers and less choice for consumers. Steam Greenlight was created as a half-ass attempt to support smaller developers who can and do thrive on Apple's ecosystem, and even then it doesn't support anywhere near the same level of openness and freedom that Apple (and soon Microsoft) will provide. Valve doesn't just give you a nice cut-and-dried checklist and straight up fee to be on Steam. You must be personally approved by the Steam gatekeepers (_after_ paying a fee just to try!). You can't even get access to the Steamworks API to do your integration work until after approval. You have no idea what fees you'll be paying, since they can and often are renegotiated on a case-by-case basis. It's a hell of a lot better than the consoles (whose current practices and the recent rise of the small to mid game and indies have more or less destroyed the console market in the last 12 months), but Steam is still a worse deal for just about everyone than the Apple/Microsoft app stores. The only selling points of Steam are that is has the community API (Microsoft and Apple both have their, but Games for Windows Live is a piece of crap and Game Center is lacking in features) and that Steam gives the multiplatform support for every purchase (which is a very nice and appreciated gesture by folks like us, but 99% of consumers currently only one PC-class platform and don't give a shit about the others).

    Steam is great because it provided a common platform and distribution channel for PC games, ushering in the digital download and service age for games when the consoles were (and they still are) totally fucking up in that space. The app stores, however, provide 90% of what Steam does, provide it at a cheaper price point and with an easier entry path to developers, and offer better integration and a mostly better user experience for consumers. Steam on Linux is a last-ditch attempt to stay relevant; the best thing that could come out of it would be a possible SteamBox kind of console (which itself may still not work out; all depends on how Sony and Microsoft react and if their console divisions get their heads out of their asses and build console platforms/ecosystems designed around the post-2010 gaming market).

    If Linux wants to succeed as a gaming platform, or a desktop OS, or even a tablet OS, it needs to stop relying on big mega companies with ulterior motives to actually do it for them. Google is not making Linux a success on phones or tablets; it's making its largely proprietary OS-with-a-Linux-kernel a success. Valve is not trying to save Linux, it's trying to save Steam. Ubuntu isn't pushing Linux as a desktop success, it's pushing Linux as The Astronaut's personal toybox. If Linux is going to succeed, the people working on it need to actually make a damn user experience that competes with modern proprietary offerings rather than Win98/XP, it needs to make a software ecosystem that is user-oriented rather than (or better yet, "as well as") developer-oriented, and it needs to market a unified developer platform rather than a toolbox to build a bazillion customized ever-so-slightly-incompatible platforms. Steam isn't going to turn Linux into a mainstream gaming OS, just like Ubuntu bug #1 is absolutely no closer to being closed today than it was when Warty Warthog was released, and just like Google has done nothing to make Linux and FOSS (rather than Android and Google) a household name.

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