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Thread: Systemd 196 Brings New Features

  1. #1
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    Default Systemd 196 Brings New Features

    Phoronix: Systemd 196 Brings New Features

    A new version of systemd was released today by Lennart Poettering. The systemd 196 release brings many new features...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTIzMzA

  2. #2
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    Is this "hybrid sleep" the same as Windows 8's "fast boot"?

    i.e. On shutdown close userspace apps, hybernate the kernel (suspend to disk) then suspend to RAM. On start either resume from RAM, disk or boot normally.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by DeiF View Post
    Is this "hybrid sleep" the same as Windows 8's "fast boot"?

    i.e. On shutdown close userspace apps, hybernate the kernel (suspend to disk) then suspend to RAM. On start either resume from RAM, disk or boot normally.
    It probably could be USED that way, but the idea of Hybrid Sleep is to combo both suspend and hibernate. Everything gets written to RAM first so that the user believes its in sleep mode, and then hibernate gets called and everything in RAM gets copied to disk. When the machine is woken up, if the battery still has a charge (and therefore RAM still holds its contents) then its just a wake from sleep. If the machine was asleep long enough that the battery ran out, then everything is pulled from the hibernation file on boot. Either way, the user has lost nothing.

  4. #4
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    It's like Windows 7:
    On a lid-close or other sleep trigger, do a regular sleep and write hibernate data to the hard drive. That way if the battery runs out, you only have lost a few more seconds to resume. This guarantees sleep won't lose your work by virtue of battery life. It also simplifies menus as there's only sleep, shutdown, and restart.

    It's unrelated to the unnecessary Windows 8's feature where some OS portions only hibernate on shutdown except when OS updates occur. For that case, just fix bootup.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by snadrus View Post
    It's like Windows 7:
    On a lid-close or other sleep trigger, do a regular sleep and write hibernate data to the hard drive. That way if the battery runs out, you only have lost a few more seconds to resume. This guarantees sleep won't lose your work by virtue of battery life. It also simplifies menus as there's only sleep, shutdown, and restart.

    It's unrelated to the unnecessary Windows 8's feature where some OS portions only hibernate on shutdown except when OS updates occur. For that case, just fix bootup.
    Removing features just to make menu simpler. Are we talking about Gnome by any chance?

    Seriously though, more often than not, I know whatever I'll be working on the laptop during next 8h or not, or if I want to preserve battery or not. Removing ability to do a specific task is not good design. And if you have 8G of RAM and 5600rpm drive, suspend to RAM is anything but fast...

  6. #6
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    Apr 2010
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    That's why Windows 8 suspends & hibernates only the kernel, which is only a few MBytes (it's fast).
    The userspace apps are closed normally as if you did a normal shutdown.

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