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Thread: Direction Of GNOME To Be Discussed Next Month

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  1. #1
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    Default Direction Of GNOME To Be Discussed Next Month

    Phoronix: Direction Of GNOME To Be Discussed Next Month

    Vincent Untz will be speaking at FOSDEM early next month in Brussels to "clarify the directions the GNOME project is taking, and to explain the rationale for various decisions." He's hoping that after this Belgian conference people will better understand the course of the GNOME desktop and begin to rebuild trust in the project...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTI3ODI

  2. #2
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    Don't you knaves SEE??/ having the interface I want is the only way to use a computer! You can't change it, stop that! Do things my way! Where did everyone go? We are going to be so big on tablets, you wait and see!

    ...plasma active / ubuntu phone / android / ios whip by....

  3. #3
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    Default Do whatever you want, GNOME

    I got tired of all the functionality - and productivity - being drained from GNOME. After using GNOME exclusively for as long as it has existed, I switched all our machines to KDE at the end of last year. It was like jumping a decade into the future. I don't really care about GNOME anymore. I don't care about their direction. To paraphrase, read my lips: it's about my productivity and ease of use, not your direction.

  4. #4
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    Why would I care about the rationalizations behind their decisions to transform their product from one I surely loved into one I surely hate?


    (my detailed gnome shell review http://forums.fedoraforum.org/archiv.../t-263609.html )
    Last edited by hubick; 01-18-2013 at 05:12 PM. Reason: add detailed review link

  5. #5
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    Vincent Untz will be speaking at FOSDEM early next month in Brussels to "clarify the directions the GNOME project is taking, and to explain the rationale for various decisions." He's hoping that after this Belgian conference people will better understand the course of the GNOME desktop and begin to rebuild trust in the project.
    So, it's not about improvements, but about propaganda?

  6. #6
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    Default User Feedback

    Gnome 3 is a great piece of work in many ways. But the designers have frequently rejected user feedback, they need to take some of that into account.

    Some things that they are doing that need work

    1. The blatant rip off of the Mac interface, they need to stop that. Things like the application menus on the top and much of the look and feel has a heavy Mac influence. They need to stop this, because if I wanted a Mac I would go buy one. The application menu on the top annoys me to no end and I don't want it.

    2. Don't ignore users with dual screens. gnome-shell is a pain to use on high resolution and dual monitor setups as there is way too much mouse movement needed to accomplish things

    3. Selecting non-docked apps is a pain

    4. Dynamic workspaces are awful (I have disabled them by default), I use workspaces for tasks and I don't like them moving around.

    These are just some of the common ones I have seen, and I would like to see the designers comment on these issues.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by kdekorte View Post
    1. The blatant rip off of the Mac interface, they need to stop that. Things like the application menus on the top and much of the look and feel has a heavy Mac influence. They need to stop this, because if I wanted a Mac I would go buy one. The application menu on the top annoys me to no end and I don't want it.
    I think Unity rips off Mac more than GNOME. I haven't used GNOME 3 yet but from what I've seen the menus and the window decorations are the only things that seem very Mac-like.

    2. Don't ignore users with dual screens. gnome-shell is a pain to use on high resolution and dual monitor setups as there is way too much mouse movement needed to accomplish things
    What I find interesting about this article is Vincent didn't explain the direction of GNOME, he just simply stated it was misunderstood. Anyways, to me, GNOME is trying to be tablet focused. That being said, if you use it for desktop PC purposes, you're likely to get a significantly worse experience. It reminds me a lot of Windows 8, where some decisions seem asinine and are unproductive but they don't really matter on a small resolution touchscreen.

    To me, GNOME 3 would receieve a lot less hate, if any, if they didn't call it GNOME. This is because it doesn't resemble GNOME 2 in any way, and it is NOT suitable as the default linux DE. Today, I'd say XFCE should get the crown of default DE. It isn't my favorite but it's the most balanced. XFCE isn't basic but it isn't full of useless features either. It isn't ugly but it's not too flashy. It doesn't have too many dependencies. It runs fine on most systems. The programs associated with it aren't all that amazing but they're stable. I see KDE being the DE of choice when you want a fancy setup that you can customize to any little way you want. Unity is good as a flashy introductory UI, but I personally find it very user unfriendly for productivity. Then there's LXDE for barebone systems. Put a PURPOSE to a DE and everyone wins in their own way.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by kdekorte View Post
    1. The blatant rip off of the Mac interface, they need to stop that. Things like the application menus on the top and much of the look and feel has a heavy Mac influence. They need to stop this, because if I wanted a Mac I would go buy one. The application menu on the top annoys me to no end and I don't want it.
    I use KDE personally but I've tried Gnome-Shell before and I have to agree with Schmidtbag. Unity is OS X with the Dock shifted over to the left side. Gnome-Shell on the other hand is something else entirely and my experiences playing around with Windows 8 lead me to believe that both Metro and Gnome-Shell are pulling off of the same design school/document that seems to be embracing the idea of simplicity through obfuscation (EULAs being a perfect example of this. EULAs are way too complicated to read without a lawyer on hand to advise you so people are just going to click next therefore it's "simpler"). But you'll note the Windows 8 and Gnome-Shell operate in pretty much the same fashion even if they're rather different in their implementation. Which points to them operating off the same idea rather than Microsoft copying off of Gnome.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by kdekorte View Post
    2. Don't ignore users with dual screens. gnome-shell is a pain to use on high resolution and dual monitor setups as there is way too much mouse movement needed to accomplish things
    3. Selecting non-docked apps is a pain
    4. Dynamic workspaces are awful (I have disabled them by default), I use workspaces for tasks and I don't like them moving around.
    The things listed by you are almost the ones I like most on Gnome. Dynamic workspaces suits great for me. I have kind of "chaotic" way to work. I just open applications/windows on one workspace, until I feel there is no room - then I move second one and so on. If I search opened window or application, I use alt+tab or alt+{key above tab}. Which again suits perfectly, after I did install the extension "Alt tab always show thumbnails".

    And, I launch applications mainly by hitting Win+few letters + enter. Fast and easy and I don' need to take my hands of my keyboard. When I need to search application using mouse from any kind of list of any kind of start menu, it is slow anyway. Traditional start-up menus tend to be quite hard to use for me when there is tons of applications on them.

    I am using quite a lot dual screen setup with my laptop. I use the default way so that second monitor does not have menus/anything other than empty screen. It feels ok, but if the user used both screens heavily, I see the problem. I know that you may enable "Workspaces" on secondary monitor too, but I have never tried it.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pawlerson View Post
    So, it's not about improvements, but about propaganda?
    It's not a discussion, it is a sermon.

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