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Thread: How Linux friendly is this build?

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  1. #1
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    Default How Linux friendly is this build?

    So I am considering buying a new desktop computer, mainly for gaming but I want to be able to install Linux on the thing without any major problems. These are the specs of the latest offer I have gotten. How Linux compatible is this?:

    Asrock B75 PRO3 ATX USB3 SATA6
    Intel Core i7 3770 3.4GHz 8MB Box S1155
    Seagate Barracuda 2TB SATA6 64MB 7200RPM
    OCZ Agility 3 Series SSD 240GB 525/500 M
    Pioneer BDR-207EBK BD-RE DL BD-XL blu-ra
    Enermax NAXN 82+ 750W PSU - 80+ Bronze m
    Enermax Vostok Midi Tower Case Black/Sil
    Kingston Value RAM DDR3 2x8GB 1600MHz CL11
    MSI GeForce GTX670 2GB DDR5 OC 2xDVI/DP/

  2. #2
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    Blue-ray (yes, I did mean to type it like that, the colour has an 'e') support isn't something I'd like to rely on under linux, but it will be able to deal with CDs and DVDs without batting an eyelid.

    Motherboards can vary in their level of support but I'd be surprised if you had issues, Linux hardware support is pretty good nowadays.

    Support for everything else should be stellar. As a disclaimer, I've not tried SATA6, so I don't know about that.

  3. #3
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    What worries me by Googling is that according to the Asrock website the MB supports Windows 8. That would imply that is supports Secureboot but that it can be disabled. But as far as I can tell there isn't the slighest mention of secureboot, much less disabling it in the manual.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kristian Joensen View Post
    What worries me by Googling is that according to the Asrock website the MB supports Windows 8. That would imply that is supports Secureboot but that it can be disabled. But as far as I can tell there isn't the slighest mention of secureboot, much less disabling it in the manual.
    Windows 8 is not preinstalled, so it doesn't need Secure Boot. Even if it were available, it wouldn't be enabled by default to allow people to install Windows 7 or XP. It's really not a problem to use a Windows 8 compatible computer, at least if Windows 8 is not preinstalled or included with the computer.

    After all I think this is a very good choice. The hardware should all be working with Linux if you install the NVIDIA proprietary driver for the graphics.
    Last edited by AlbertP; 01-24-2013 at 09:03 AM.

  5. #5
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    Hello!
    I recommend using either Xeon - either 1155 (dualchannel) or 2011 (quadchannel), or desktop Piledriver CPUs (lower price segment) with unbuffered ECC memory for greatly improved reliability.
    ASRock is not good vendor in terms of support.
    Pioneer drives are ok.
    The PSU quality is very good, but its price/performance is mediocre. I recommend looking at Seasonic or other brands that employ primary / secondary 105C solid Hi-Caps and circuit protections.

  6. #6
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    Thanks for the input brosis But I am only really interested in Linux compatibility in this thread. I know blu-ray will be an issue but I want everything else to work and if possible to work out of the gate. I live in a country with a very limited selection of goods and services, so I can't get just any CPU or MB or anything really. I am limited by what the shops can get from their(often Danish) suppliers.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kristian Joensen View Post
    Thanks for the input brosis But I am only really interested in Linux compatibility in this thread. I know blu-ray will be an issue but I want everything else to work and if possible to work out of the gate. I live in a country with a very limited selection of goods and services, so I can't get just any CPU or MB or anything really. I am limited by what the shops can get from their(often Danish) suppliers.
    Hello, in case you can not purchase Xeons, please use AMD desktop processors instead with desktop motherboards of reliable brands (ASUS, MSI etc). The only limiting factor would then be the availability of unbuffered ECC memory, which all AMD desktop systems with notable exception of ASRock support. Scientific studies estimate memory corruption probability of non-ECC memory to be around 33% per year.

    Of course, if the data you work with is not important and you don't mind higher crash probability, the best option would be Intel Desktop processors.

    Regarding PSUs, it is advisable to pick affordable 80Plus Silver and higher rating units available and affordable in your area and then do some research on capacitors type from reviews. For example from jonnyguru.
    105c rated japanese Nippon Chemicon, Rubicon are the best ones. The board soldering should also be of good quality, then you will enjoy your efficient and reliable PSU for many years. Enermax have a reputation of not only building elite, but also possessing damaging elitism..

  8. #8
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    It's a fine build. Remember that not all disk utilities in Linux properly recognize and format Advanced Format drives, so you will have to adjust your installation process for the HDD accordingly.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheLexMachine View Post
    It's a fine build. Remember that not all disk utilities in Linux properly recognize and format Advanced Format drives, so you will have to adjust your installation process for the HDD accordingly.
    Hello. This is IMHO incorrect, as only parted/gparted are able to map the disks correctly and also create a GPT table. Fdisk and other tools have not been updated for years and their use is IMHO a legacy.
    Also, my experiences are such that Advanced Format harddisks are all falsely marking themselves as "normal 512-kb" drives, even in SMART. Possibly its a workaround for pre-Windows Vista compatibility.
    Eitherway, the reliable way is to check if its AF drive is the disk manufacturer documentation or question on official forums.

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