Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 18 of 18

Thread: How Linux friendly is this build?

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Faroe Islands
    Posts
    178

    Default

    This is encouraging. What if any are the major issues to look out for with regard to UEFI support under Linux?

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    132

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Kristian Joensen View Post
    This is encouraging. What if any are the major issues to look out for with regard to UEFI support under Linux?
    If you're using integrated graphics, nothing. If you are using an add-in card, which you intend to, disabling UEFI in the BIOS is the only way to use your add-in card unless it's UEFI compatible. There may be problems with other add-in cards as well but only GPUs have been reported at this time.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    6,607

    Default

    If you want to try UEFI the most secure way is to have got a backup of your firmware chip. Sometimes you can do that with the integrated flash utility. When you have it you could order in case of problems a correct replacement or the mac adress of your integrated nic will be a default one. If you manage to "kill" a laptop with uefi tests you should probably get a spi flashing device when it is not in warrenty. I needed a chip replacement already last year after some simple tests, so update firmware to latest version and hope that most bugs are already fixed (board used was Asus P8Z68-V with buggy firmware 3203). All Asus boards suffer from another cleanup UEFI entry error but there is a trick to avoid it when you use differnet upper/lowercase for the loader (efibootmgr -l) in case you really want to use different optionsets with one kernel as direct boot entry.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    351

    Default you gotta try it

    I've put together systems where all of the components individually were right off the RHEL supported list but when assembled together, no go. There are obscure interactions between kernel versions, motherboard chipsets and drive firmwares. Sometimes firmware upgrades fix problems and sometimes they break things. I've spent far too much time debugging these things trying to make a stable system. There is no rhyme or reason, only empirical results.

    You actually have to plug all of those things together, install the OS and run some torture tests before you can call it "working".

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    1,259

    Default

    Blue-ray (yes, I did mean to type it like that, the colour has an 'e')
    The marketing department doesn't always adhere to grammar (or logic). The name is 'Blu-Ray', so trying to convince everyone that it's 'Blue-Ray' is like screaming, "I'm a moron!" and then trying to convince everyone that it's a good thing to be a moron because you use a different definition than the rest of the world uses..

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    351

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DanL View Post
    The marketing department doesn't always adhere to grammar (or logic).
    The "marketing department" is actually 100% brilliant for creating a new word that can be trademarked so that its usage can be controlled and the consumer can know that they are purchasing a drive that meets the specifications.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    449

    Default

    It was meant to be amusing, I should have added a smiley to it :-)

  8. #18
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    353

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Kristian Joensen View Post
    What worries me by Googling is that according to the Asrock website the MB supports Windows 8. That would imply that is supports Secureboot but that it can be disabled. But as far as I can tell there isn't the slighest mention of secureboot, much less disabling it in the manual.
    Windows 8 is not preinstalled, so it doesn't need Secure Boot. Even if it were available, it wouldn't be enabled by default to allow people to install Windows 7 or XP. It's really not a problem to use a Windows 8 compatible computer, at least if Windows 8 is not preinstalled or included with the computer.

    After all I think this is a very good choice. The hardware should all be working with Linux if you install the NVIDIA proprietary driver for the graphics.
    Last edited by AlbertP; 01-24-2013 at 09:03 AM.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •