Quote Originally Posted by Delgarde View Post
You say that, but why? It's not a completely unfamiliar OS - it's just the latest upgrade to the one I've been running for years, and which I expect to work *more or less* the same way as the previous version.
...that happens to contain completely new installer and upgrader code, a fact which is specifically listed in the release notes, which you *really ought to read*. That's what I'm talking about here, as it's mostly what the thread has been about. The rest of F18 is a pretty normal release and should be pretty solid, but the installer and upgrader code is entirely new, and this is hardly something we've hidden.

Quote Originally Posted by Delgarde View Post
My complaints are with the way you're presenting this as a big deal, that people shouldn't be upgrading casually. I'm sure it's not your intention, but your messages are coming across with a strong subtext of "don't trust this release".
It is a big deal, because any time you do a ground-up rewrite of code as sensitive as the installer and the upgrade system, there's going to be borkage. My personal advice is to ensure you back up any sensitive data before installing or upgrading to F18. This is actually the sensible thing to do before you upgrade or install *any* OS, yes even 'just the next version of the one you were using before'. Upgrading in particular is an inherently sensitive operation and subject to the same 'problem space' problem I mentioned earlier: we (distributors) can test upgrade _mechanisms_ reasonably well, but it's very hard to test that upgrade goes off without a hitch in all of the billions or trillions of possible machine configurations (storage configuration, bootloader configuration and package set, mostly). My experience across distros (at least MDV, Fedora and Ubuntu) and operating systems (Windows - Microsoft's official advice is that you do not rely on upgrades between Windows releases working without problems, and in several Windows releases, they didn't offer a real 'upgrade' mechanism) is that even with releases which *aren't* major rewrites, you shouldn't trust the upgrade function unreservedly.