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Thread: David Airlie Talks About RandR 1.4, Reverse PRIME

  1. #1
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    Default David Airlie Talks About RandR 1.4, Reverse PRIME

    Phoronix: David Airlie Talks About RandR 1.4, Reverse PRIME

    Aside from the real story behind Wayland and X, another Linux graphics focused presentation at LCA 2013 was by David Airlie talking about his work on RandR 1.4 / PRIME...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTI5NTM

  2. #2
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    Michael, you're posting too much. You should calm down and focus only on very important articles that actually make sense.

  3. #3
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    In fairness, Michael is just catching up on all the presentation videos from FOSDEM. It's hard to do that without posting a lot...

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by asdx View Post
    What's the equivalent of RandR/XRandR in Wayland?
    It's just called Wayland. RandR only has it's own name in X because it was an addition that's not part of the core protocol.

  5. #5
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    Default HTML5 Video tag - MP4 and Firefox

    Firefox does not support the MP4 container with the <video> tag.

    I love the fact that you are using the video tag, but the video will not show up for us Firefox users.

    http://stackoverflow.com/questions/1...ng-html5-video

  6. #6
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    Hopefully gpu hotplugging means in the future we can install a new graphics card the following way:
    - tell software to make graphics card ready to be removed
    - wait until software ready
    - unplug graphics card
    (3d apps are pauzed and rendering of windows is done by CPU)
    - plug new graphics card in
    - install drivers (installer graphics should be simple enough for CPU rendering to handle)

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by plonoma View Post
    Hopefully gpu hotplugging means in the future we can install a new graphics card the following way:
    - tell software to make graphics card ready to be removed
    - wait until software ready
    - unplug graphics card
    (3d apps are pauzed and rendering of windows is done by CPU)
    - plug new graphics card in
    - install drivers (installer graphics should be simple enough for CPU rendering to handle)
    Don't see the benefit. How many times in a month does one replace it's GPU? And is it that bad to reboot? Come on...

    Just because Windows does it doesn't mean Linux should be capable to do it as well.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rexilion View Post
    Don't see the benefit. How many times in a month does one replace it's GPU? And is it that bad to reboot? Come on...

    Just because Windows does it doesn't mean Linux should be capable to do it as well.
    In the general sense of being able to add/remove GPUs, lots of people do it multiple times per day. The most common is probably the Optimus scenario where a discrete GPU is enabled/disabled based on available power, but external GPUs are already in some laptop docking stations as well, a trend that's likely to increase as Thunderbolt support becomes more common. Adding the actual physical hotplugging of a card to this is more of a PCIe problem than a GPU problem.
    Last edited by Ex-Cyber; 02-07-2013 at 09:21 AM.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ex-Cyber View Post
    In the general sense of being able to add/remove GPUs, lots of people do it multiple times per day. The most common is probably the Optimus scenario where a discrete GPU is enabled/disabled based on available power, but external GPUs are already in some laptop docking stations as well, a trend that's likely to increase as Thunderbolt support becomes more common. Adding the actual physical hotplugging of a card to this is more of a PCIe problem than a GPU problem.
    But isn't there a big difference between just enabling/disabling a GPU chipset (and vice versa with another) and doing hotplugging??

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