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Thread: Linus Torvalds Is Back To Using GNOME 3 Desktop

  1. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by blackout23 View Post
    Every desktop that has to rely on tweak tools to give people basic functionally seems to be fundamentally flawed.
    Have fun with your extensions they'll no longer work 2-3 iterations from now. Pretty cool especially when extension developers no longer support the extension you need and don't port it to the new gnome shell version.
    Gnome 3.8 brings back classic Gnome 2.x design, implemented as a shell.

    But to be honest, Gnome 3.6 is already the best desktop I've ever used on Linux, thus far. I hate Gnome 2.x and I still think KDE4 is superb. But Gnome 2 would be a massive step backwards, IM(very)HO.

    I do think that tiling in Gnome 3 can be taken a step further, still.

    ---

    I also wonder what basic functionality is lost... Middle click to minimize, windows-key for search and overview and task-tray, ALT-F4 to close (should be Ctrl+middle mouse click, but that can be adjusted), windows+up is maximize, windows+left/right is tiling, windows+down is 'un-maximize'. Also; press Enter to slide the lockscreen. Workspaces are dymanic and Ctrl+Alt+down/up is switching workspaces. Best of all maybe is more screen real-estate, less visual noise and a notification-design that doesn't distract me like fsck.

    Suspend to RAM is simply Alt+clicking on shutdown button.

    ---

    If you like Gnome 2 and if you are convinced Gnome 3 axes functionality; you're just dumb and like to live in the past. This is minimalism that for the first time convinced me that less can actualy be more.

    It's faster than Gnome 2 and usage of OpenGL 1.x is perfect, since it works perfectly with the open drivers. No longer are there any WM glitches when playing an OpenGL game in full screen and using compoziting window management at the same time.
    Last edited by V!NCENT; 03-10-2013 at 10:41 AM.

  2. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by V!NCENT View Post
    But to be honest, Gnome 3.6 is already the best desktop I've ever used on Linux, thus far.
    True. Gnome 3.8 takes this a looong step further. To bad Phoronix doesnt cover gnome development all that much.

  3. #63
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    Sep 2011
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    Link to prove how great the design of Gnome Shell is:
    http://lleksah.wordpress.com/2013/03.../#comment-3300

    * menus on windows is a hack
    * no Gtk widgets in gnome shell because gnome shell == window manager

    -> the "proper" design already contains hacks and is still quite limited in its use.
    Such restrictions don't exist in plasma.

  4. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by V!NCENT View Post
    Gnome 3.8 brings back classic Gnome 2.x design, implemented as a shell.

    But to be honest, Gnome 3.6 is already the best desktop I've ever used on Linux, thus far. I hate Gnome 2.x and I still think KDE4 is superb. But Gnome 2 would be a massive step backwards, IM(very)HO.

    I do think that tiling in Gnome 3 can be taken a step further, still.

    ---

    I also wonder what basic functionality is lost... Middle click to minimize, windows-key for search and overview and task-tray, ALT-F4 to close (should be Ctrl+middle mouse click, but that can be adjusted), windows+up is maximize, windows+left/right is tiling, windows+down is 'un-maximize'. Also; press Enter to slide the lockscreen. Workspaces are dymanic and Ctrl+Alt+down/up is switching workspaces. Best of all maybe is more screen real-estate, less visual noise and a notification-design that doesn't distract me like fsck.

    Suspend to RAM is simply Alt+clicking on shutdown button.

    ---

    If you like Gnome 2 and if you are convinced Gnome 3 axes functionality; you're just dumb and like to live in the past. This is minimalism that for the first time convinced me that less can actualy be more.

    It's faster than Gnome 2 and usage of OpenGL 1.x is perfect, since it works perfectly with the open drivers. No longer are there any WM glitches when playing an OpenGL game in full screen and using compoziting window management at the same time.
    I see you are VERY HUMBLE. In your "IM(very)HO" everyone that thinks Gnome 3 axes functionality is dumb. Nice...

    Let me tell you that all this funcionality you described in your post, is absolutely basic. It is funcionality for the casual desktop use case. Like we said many times ago. When you find a way to work with many windows in a sane manner in Gnome 3, post again to tell us...

  5. #65
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    Nov 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by TemplarGR View Post
    Let me tell you that all this funcionality you described in your post, is absolutely basic. It is funcionality for the casual desktop use case. Like we said many times ago. When you find a way to work with many windows in a sane manner in Gnome 3, post again to tell us...
    I currently have 8 windows open on two workspaces. One workspace for general browsing, email and music. One for the work I am currently doing (currently a text editor, a browser, and an IDE). If I work on more than one thing I put that on a separate workspace as well.
    Switching task is now a simple matter of CTRL-ALT-<up/down> or <Super> to switch via the overlay.
    Switching between windows is either <ALT>-<TAB> or <Super>.
    It works very well.

  6. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by kigurai View Post
    I currently have 8 windows open on two workspaces. One workspace for general browsing, email and music. One for the work I am currently doing (currently a text editor, a browser, and an IDE). If I work on more than one thing I put that on a separate workspace as well.
    Switching task is now a simple matter of CTRL-ALT-<up/down> or <Super> to switch via the overlay.
    Switching between windows is either <ALT>-<TAB> or <Super>.
    It works very well.
    So let me ask you one thing and one thing only:

    Wasn't the same thing possible with GNOME 2? Workspaces are old...

    Plus, what you said isn't solving the major problems of Gnome Shell... My problem is not dividing applications to separate workspaces... It is too much work everytime to try to make the shell behave in a manner that is productive when you want to use multiple windows...

  7. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by TemplarGR View Post
    So let me ask you one thing and one thing only:

    Wasn't the same thing possible with GNOME 2? Workspaces are old...
    Sure they were. But that's not the question you asked.
    And, personally I feel I make better use of workspaces now than before.

    Plus, what you said isn't solving the major problems of Gnome Shell... My problem is not dividing applications to separate workspaces... It is too much work everytime to try to make the shell behave in a manner that is productive when you want to use multiple windows...
    And I just said I have no problem using multiple windows. There's five of them on my current workspace. Three on the other. And I switch heavily between them.
    No, sorry, I don't see the problem.

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