Page 2 of 8 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 80

Thread: Ubuntu To Investigate Digital Rights Management

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    SuperUserLand
    Posts
    536

    Default

    " No one is trying to circuvment Steam "


    :/

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Basement
    Posts
    389

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bwat47 View Post
    QT is a GUI toolkit and has absolutely nothing to do with DRM, stop posting such nonsense.
    Im sorry for your ignorance. A few years ago Trolltech owned Qt and they sold Qt licenses to settop box companies. That was as closed source and DRM as it gets. Hell Trolltech even went through the pain of providing ways for binary compability to shit DRM. DRM was some of Qts main business.

    I hope you learned something today. Now stop defending one of the WORST DRM offenders out there. And Nokia wasnt much better. http://arstechnica.com/information-t...bile-platform/

    Of course then Nokia realized Qt was shit and they dumped it. After that we all know Qt went down the "lets port to shit platforms like iOS and fucking blackberry." So yeah Qt is shit.
    Last edited by funkSTAR; 03-06-2013 at 12:37 PM.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    275

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BO$$ View Post
    Try to see it the way the content providers see these issues and you won't be so against it anymore.
    I try to see it their way and still find it hard to accept DRM. Those interested in distributing content through piracy are familiar with DRM circumvention and thus to them DRM circumvention is trivial. It is only for legitimate users, wishing to transfer the content to a different platform, or to use it on an unsupported platform, that DRM is a challenge. Thus, DRM really only hurts legit paying customers, not pirates. So, regardless of whether one believes in IP protection or not in a general sense, DRM specifically is not a logical solution.

    But, BO$$, I do agree when you say that Canonical / Ubuntu needs to satisfy content providers' requirements if they want to play with the big boys. An analogy is like when we have to decide between open source drivers and proprietary drivers for a product where the proprietary drivers provide superior performance. Proprietary might not be our preference, but sometimes, the performance is more valuable than the warm fuzzy.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Linuxland
    Posts
    5,034

    Default

    @BO$$

    Their viewpoint is rather flawed. DRM hurts customers, and piracy equals free advertising.

    I am a content producer myself, and have in the past uploaded my own products on TPB. Embrace it, instead of fighting it, you will only lose customers by adding DRM.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    971

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Pallidus View Post
    " No one is trying to circuvment Steam "


    :/
    Please quote whole phrase: "No one is trying to circuvment Steam, unless he has serious reason."
    Reason nr 1. Steam not available for his OS. Now invalid.
    Reason nr 2. He dislike DRM. But he can still purchase Steam copy to pay developers and play by rules. What he looses is Steam anti-cheat protection, updates, chance for nosteam to have malware and no access messaging. Only few do that, as steam does not fsck up the internals of the OS and offline mode is also available.
    Reason nr 3. No money. Thats ultimate culprit of proprietary and they better leave the guy alone, because if they allow him to play - he will be future customer, but not now. And now, he can't be customer, regardless how you turn it.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    60

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BO$$ View Post

    Would you want the users to steal your product and give it away for free? Try to see it the way the content providers see these issues and you won't be so against it anymore.
    Rediculous. Go on <insert torrent site here> and see of what use DRM is.
    They have even created alternative networks for Battlefield Bad Company 2, Battlefield 3 (in the works?), Modern Warfare 2 and dozens of other mainly-multiplayer games. There is even a LAN crack for Starcraft 2 available, which has very aggressive DRM.

    EA, the makers of Battlefield 3 even shipped their own product with a crack, because they were incapable of fixing a bug in their DRM system in time, which caused legit copies of the game to not work correctly, while the pirated versions of the game worked.

    Quote Originally Posted by BO$$ View Post

    They should probably close down some parts of the OS or obfuscate it some way. You can't have everything open when security is at stake. Remember: you own a license to use the software not the software itself.
    Please tell me you are joking!

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    457

    Default

    DRM is pointless. People who want to copy do. Those that will pay will if the conditions are right. Either side does not need restricted content.

    Let me give a real example. I purchased a Nexus 7 on day 1, and I got a $20 Google Play gift and free Transformers movie. I've never watched the damn thing and probably wont. If I do I will simple download it from sites like The Pirate Bay as I'd prefer to get a open version.
    If the movies I want were once off payments of a very small price and downloadable, I would buy 100% of the movies.

    The simple fact is DRM only rips off customers.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    457

    Default

    Microsoft killed their OS speeds buy putting in a protected(DRM) software bus. Now everything you run on Windows takes forever to get clearance to start and talk to other applications/network.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    19

    Default Canonical is so powerful!

    What an excellent news!
    So at this moment Canonical is working on:
    * Ubuntu TV (not finished, even no alpha version)
    * Ubuntu Phone (not finished but there is public alpha version mostly reused Android code on fundamental parts)
    * Unity Next
    * Mir - X.org/Wayland replacement (there is [non-functional] alpha version)
    * DRM support

    I'm very excited about this!
    It is very good that finally we have so powerful Linux company like Canonical.
    In the past I thought that Red Hat or Google are financially capable to do something about Linux, but I was wrong.

    What will be next?
    Canonical will acquire Google or Valve? Maybe both?
    Last edited by Danniello; 03-06-2013 at 01:17 PM.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    6

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BO$$ View Post
    It's a valid issue. You want content you have to satisfy the content provider's requirements. Canonical is a company operating for profit trying to gain a larger marketshare. What do you think they'll do? Listen to some hippies on forums crying that DRM is wrong or go play with the big boys by their rules? You don't like it? Leave! Oh but wait, both OS X and Windows use DRM to restrict your content. Oh well, guess you'll have to learn to enjoy it. You always view these issues as if they are abusing you in some way but think about the content providers? Would you want the users to steal your product and give it away for free? Try to see it the way the content providers see these issues and you won't be so against it anymore.

    They should probably close down some parts of the OS or obfuscate it some way. You can't have everything open when security is at stake. Remember: you own a license to use the software not the software itself.
    Wow, I don't even know where to begin. So our choices are OSX, Windows and Ubuntu? Gee, what happened to the other distros, or *BSDs? Content providers can kiss my ass, why is it my concern to "think about" what they want when it comes to my OS choices and deciding whether or not to exclusively use FOSS?

    Then you go on to glamorize security through obscurity (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Securit...uments_against). Everything can't be open when security is at stake, huh? Tell that to these guys: http://www.openssl.org/ Gosh, I hope your bank isn't using open standards to encrypt its web traffic, it's open so that means everyone can tamper with it!

    And who claimed to own Ubuntu? How about you tell us who DOES own Ubuntu Linux? The content providers? Let me know when the content providers decide to make all of Ubuntu closed source and take away our "licenses" to use any of the code.

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •