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Thread: Shuttleworth Comments On Future Ubuntu Releases

  1. #1
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    Default Shuttleworth Comments On Future Ubuntu Releases

    Phoronix: Shuttleworth Comments On Future Ubuntu Releases

    Mark Shuttleworth recently downplayed the likelihood that Ubuntu would turn into a true rolling-release distribution, but that changes were likely abound. He's now written another blog post about considerations being made at the company for future Ubuntu Linux releases...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTMyNTA

  2. #2
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    Cool Marketing

    They get a lot of free marketing every time they do a release.

    I don't think they want to give that up anytime soon.
    Last edited by rvalles; 03-12-2013 at 02:46 AM. Reason: typo

  3. #3
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    Default

    So, closer to Debian's release cycle and more server oriented than end user?

    The best "rolling release" strategy I've seen is Chakra's: keep core packages (kernel, libc, etc.) relatively stable but update user-space components (desktop apps) more frequently. Of course for Chakra it's easier because they have far less packages to manage than Debian or Ubuntu, but I think the strategy is still an interesting one.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cyborg16 View Post
    The best "rolling release" strategy I've seen is Chakra's: keep core packages (kernel, libc, etc.) relatively stable but update user-space components (desktop apps) more frequently. Of course for Chakra it's easier because they have far less packages to manage than Debian or Ubuntu, but I think the strategy is still an interesting one.
    +1


    Also, there is no Ubuntu for me, they just fraked up too much

  5. #5
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    Lightbulb Arch and Gentoo

    The most popular two distributions that are doing continuous updates reasonably well are Arch and Gentoo.

    The former is relatively low-maintainance and easy to use, to the point I recommend it to power-users with no Linux experience. Their "Beginner's Guide" walks them through the install process while teaching them Linux fundamentals; As I've learnt, this seems to result on users continuing to try and learn Linux stuff after the install, rather than discarding Linux as useless (Ubuntu, a commercial distribution that has nothing to do with the others (different like Android) and is popular for its dumbed down interface) or too hard (other true community-based distros like Debian or Gentoo. It's not that these are hard, but they don't have learning built in in the install process in the manner Arch does, so for a non-experienced user the curve is often too steep).
    Last edited by rvalles; 03-12-2013 at 05:29 AM. Reason: better wording

  6. #6
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    Default Browsers are crucial

    It is crucial that web browsers such as Firefox and Chromium are quickly and frequently updated!

  7. #7
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Redi44 View Post
    +1


    Also, there is no Ubuntu for me, they just fraked up too much
    Ok, so stop reading Ubuntu related articles and getting angery..... if you don't like something, stop caring about it and move on. Its not healthy to dwell on things.

  8. #8
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Cyborg16 View Post
    So, closer to Debian's release cycle and more server oriented than end user?

    The best "rolling release" strategy I've seen is Chakra's: keep core packages (kernel, libc, etc.) relatively stable but update user-space components (desktop apps) more frequently. Of course for Chakra it's easier because they have far less packages to manage than Debian or Ubuntu, but I think the strategy is still an interesting one.
    Yeah, Chakra got their release model right for consumer devices. Really hope Ubuntu will follow. I don't use Ubuntu, but I would like to see the most popular Linux distro (and it's derivitives: Mint, Elementary, etc) move to a better model.

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