Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: There Isn't Too Much Progress On Unigine Linux Titles

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    13,415

    Default There Isn't Too Much Progress On Unigine Linux Titles

    Phoronix: There Isn't Too Much Progress On Unigine Linux Titles

    For those that have followed Phoronix over the years know that I am a big supporter of the Unigine game/3D engine. The engine delivers absolutely beautiful graphics and there is first-rate Linux support. The developers at Unigine Corp are very Linux-friendly. Unfortunately, games and other software based upon Unigine aren't too quick to come to the Linux gaming scene...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTMzOTc

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Moscow
    Posts
    56

    Default

    "Dilogus: The Windows of War"
    LOL, it's "Winds of War", not Windows! I hope Microsoft hasn't infiltrated that fantasy universe yet!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    432

    Default

    Dilogus, eh. I remember reading their blog and getting excited about this game
    waaay before Steam for Linux was even announced, and even donated to it
    I think. Then, slowly, their blog started to feature less and less info about the
    game and more posts talked about their other, Windows-only title "inMomentum",
    and now I think the last thing that was heard about Dilogus might be over a year old.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Europe
    Posts
    265

    Default

    Relics of Annoranth is a Unigine engine based game, which will probably start on kickstarter this month or so: https://forum.annorath-game.com/inde...pic,190.0.html

    But I am not too optimistic that this game will be an success. Their current game content videos: http://www.youtube.com/user/RelicsOfAnnorath

    Looks like they lack developers quite bad. I mean the graphics and content is great, but otherwise there doesn't seem to be much progress. Not even enough developers to have a proper corporation website (https://portal.quantum-bytes.com/).
    Last edited by Fenrin; 03-31-2013 at 04:57 PM.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    357

    Default

    There's a great Unigine powered game that's available for Linux, too. It's still alpha so don't expect much, but what it shows is so amazing that my friends and me can't stop playing: Kerbal Space Program. It's even on Steam (early access) since a short time.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    32

    Default

    I don't know what the licensing looks like now but I know a few years ago they use to post the cost on the site. When I looking at game engines I saw what the indie developer cost was and it was way out of my price range. If the prices are still the same you are most likely only going to end up with big studios using it for games. Most developers will probably look at Unity3D just because of the cost benefit when working in a small team. I would still love to use the engine, especially since I've already wasted money on other engines that didn't live up to the hype. Now I'm doing it all from scratch.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Europe
    Posts
    265

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by TAXI View Post
    There's a great Unigine powered game that's available for Linux, too. It's still alpha so don't expect much, but what it shows is so amazing that my friends and me can't stop playing: Kerbal Space Program. It's even on Steam (early access) since a short time.

    haha almost thought you are serious that this game is Unigine engine based But this must be a first April joke.

    https://www.kerbalspaceprogram.com/about.php

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    1,024

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by migizi View Post
    I don't know what the licensing looks like now but I know a few years ago they use to post the cost on the site. When I looking at game engines I saw what the indie developer cost was and it was way out of my price range. If the prices are still the same you are most likely only going to end up with big studios using it for games. Most developers will probably look at Unity3D just because of the cost benefit when working in a small team. I would still love to use the engine, especially since I've already wasted money on other engines that didn't live up to the hype. Now I'm doing it all from scratch.
    Not even bigger studios care. Unreal4 is looking even more impressive, more affordable, and existing huge swaths of U3 experienced people can likely get to work easier with it than Unigine. Also, still, what are the _tools_ like in Unigine? Who knows.

    One of the absolute least important things is how "visually impressive" the engine is. You can make any crappy engine visually impressive with a few experienced graphics devs, some middleware, and a ton of talented artists (which is where most of the visual appeal comes from).

    And if you really care about some particular feature or look, you're probably doing it all in-house anyway. The last thing a studio on a tight deadline needs is to be held at whatever pace upstream devs work at. It's easier to get all the basics in on your own then have 100% control than it is to buy all the basics premade and hope you can do what you need with provided source or convince upstream to prioritize your requests.

    I would at this point consisder the market "owned" with Unreal at the top-end and Unity at the bottom-end, with a few niche engines for niche markets (MMO-oriented engines that include sophisticated server and communication components and tools, for example). There's little room for a new engine, especially once that has no particular niche or killer feature.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    32

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by elanthis View Post
    Not even bigger studios care. Unreal4 is looking even more impressive, more affordable, and existing huge swaths of U3 experienced people can likely get to work easier with it than Unigine. Also, still, what are the _tools_ like in Unigine? Who knows.

    One of the absolute least important things is how "visually impressive" the engine is. You can make any crappy engine visually impressive with a few experienced graphics devs, some middleware, and a ton of talented artists (which is where most of the visual appeal comes from).

    And if you really care about some particular feature or look, you're probably doing it all in-house anyway. The last thing a studio on a tight deadline needs is to be held at whatever pace upstream devs work at. It's easier to get all the basics in on your own then have 100% control than it is to buy all the basics premade and hope you can do what you need with provided source or convince upstream to prioritize your requests.

    I would at this point consisder the market "owned" with Unreal at the top-end and Unity at the bottom-end, with a few niche engines for niche markets (MMO-oriented engines that include sophisticated server and communication components and tools, for example). There's little room for a new engine, especially once that has no particular niche or killer feature.
    You can request an evaluation kit if you want to see what the tools are like. As for graphics, we know anything can look good with proper work. I think the thing Unigine has is 3.2+ core profile support. All the OGL engines I've looked at are still working 2.1, those with 3.0 support are compatibility profile. For me this is a breaking point since I don't want to build off of 2.1. (I really don't care about the argument of targeting older hardware either)

    The reason I looked at Unigine is at the time it appeared that the UDK worked under Linux. What I hate about Unity is that you can build for Linux but you still have to do your development in Windows or Mac. I do all my work in Linux and would rather not have to use a different OS just to build a game for the platform I prefer to use.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Vilnius, Lithuania
    Posts
    2,395

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by elanthis View Post
    Unreal4 is looking even more impressive, more affordable, and existing huge swaths of U3 experienced people can likely get to work easier with it than Unigine. I would at this point consisder the market "owned" with Unreal at the top-end and Unity at the bottom-end, with a few niche engines for niche markets (MMO-oriented engines that include sophisticated server and communication components and tools, for example).
    Unreal Engine 4, UE3 and Unreal Engine.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •