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Thread: Samsung Introduces "LAB" Linux Frequency Governor

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ericg View Post
    We're aware that it uses more frign, but for some bizarre reason linux seems to be worse at thermal management than windows (I dont know how thats possible... im just speaking from experience.)

    For example. This very laptop (Dell XPS 13z) running Arch linux, if I place it on my lap in such a way that my leg blocks the vent the laptop will gradually rise in temperature until it hits 95C and then BIOS kills the power to the entire laptop to prevent damage.

    The same laptop running Windows 7 doing the same thing, also with my leg blocking the vent, will hit 85C and stay there, never shutting down.

    ^While anecdotal evidence, this isnt a "This happened once, so im telling the story." I had Arch Linux on this laptop for about 8 months or so and would accidentally overheat it at least once a week. I've had Win7 on this thing for about a month now and havent accidentally overheated it even once.

    If I ever put arch linux back on this laptop I very well may stick to the powersave governor just to make sure I dont accidentally damage the internals from thermal output
    Same for me, but we are not alone https://bbs.archlinux.org/viewtopic.php?id=149901

    my post:
    same for my Laptop. The temps on archlinux are significantly higher than on Windows. For me thats around 10C difference, too.
    I didnt compare it to ubuntu, but I shall do that. Also I will compare the temps of my desktop PC soon (Arch vs Ubuntu vs Windows 7).
    I started a similar thread in the German forums some 2 months ago: https://bbs.archlinux.de/viewtopic.php?id=22089

    Arch in general seems to be very affected as there is a vast numberof complains about cpu overheating in the forums
    e.g. https://bbs.archlinux.org/viewtopic.php?id=143580
    https://bbs.archlinux.org/viewtopic.php?id=148456
    https://bbs.archlinux.org/viewtopic.php?id=148695

  2. #12
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    For people with an AMD gpu: the oss drivers keep the gpu in the "mid" or even "high" profile, even if it's not doing anything. That's because a (really) small number of gpus tend to output errors/artifacts on the "low" profile. However, this increases temperature. If you want to enable dynamic power profile or force a particular profile (you may want to, expecially on laptops), follow this steps from archwiki.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by cip91 View Post
    For people with an AMD gpu: the oss drivers keep the gpu in the "mid" or even "high" profile, even if it's not doing anything. That's because a (really) small number of gpus tend to output errors/artifacts on the "low" profile. However, this increases temperature. If you want to enable dynamic power profile or force a particular profile (you may want to, expecially on laptops), follow this steps from archwiki.
    Thank you, I'll look through it!

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nuc!eoN View Post
    Thank you, I'll look through it!
    Dynpm only alternates between mid and high profiles. Also it doesn't always complete the reclock during the v-blank so sometimes when it switches you see brief flickering on the screen. We're still waiting on AMD to release proper PM docs to figure out why our reclocking takes longer then a v-blank to complete and why catalyst doesn't.

  5. #15
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    Myself, I use "low" profile, conservative governor (believe it or not, it actually does make a difference in temperature), and phc (with a patch for 3.8...)
    Besides that, I've got thinkpad_acpi configured to allow fan control--I use "level auto" by default, but thinkfan or a script to switch to level 7 for high loads.

    I rather wish there were a daemon that combines the features of acpid, thinkfan, and cpufreqd, so you can base settings on cpu frequency, programs running, acpi events, _and_ temperatures.

    Oh, and by the way...LAB is more-or-less like Turbo Boost, except for its relation to the nominal frequency and capabilities of the processor.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ibidem View Post
    Myself, I use "low" profile, conservative governor (believe it or not, it actually does make a difference in temperature), and phc (with a patch for 3.8...)
    Besides that, I've got thinkpad_acpi configured to allow fan control--I use "level auto" by default, but thinkfan or a script to switch to level 7 for high loads.

    I rather wish there were a daemon that combines the features of acpid, thinkfan, and cpufreqd, so you can base settings on cpu frequency, programs running, acpi events, _and_ temperatures.

    Oh, and by the way...LAB is more-or-less like Turbo Boost, except for its relation to the nominal frequency and capabilities of the processor.
    Of course Conservative makes a difference in temperature.

    Powersave keeps it at lets say 800mhz under any load
    Ondemand lets it sit at 800mhz, but kicks it up to MAX (for me 1.6ghz) immediately under any load to get it done as fast as possible.
    Conservative sits at 800mhz, and when a load hits gradually kicks the frequency up by one step (I think a step on intel is like...50mhz? I could be totally wrong on that though) until the load is done, then it drops it back to 800mhz.

    Conservative helps temperature because you're only ever gonna hit max frequencies if its a sustained load in which case you probably WANT maximum frequency, otherwise you're sitting around middle frequency. Lower frequency = lower temperature.

    And yeah LAB is like turbo boost.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by cip91 View Post
    For people with an AMD gpu: the oss drivers keep the gpu in the "mid" or even "high" profile, even if it's not doing anything. That's because a (really) small number of gpus tend to output errors/artifacts on the "low" profile. However, this increases temperature. If you want to enable dynamic power profile or force a particular profile (you may want to, expecially on laptops), follow this steps from archwiki.
    forcing the 'low' profile does drop my GPU idle temps to 50 - 55C but the processor ends up running hotter even after cpufreq was used to lock the frequencies to 525MHz. So there's noappreciable benefit in the end,

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by cip91 View Post
    For people with an AMD gpu: the oss drivers keep the gpu in the "mid" or even "high" profile, even if it's not doing anything. That's because a (really) small number of gpus tend to output errors/artifacts on the "low" profile. However, this increases temperature. If you want to enable dynamic power profile or force a particular profile (you may want to, expecially on laptops), follow this steps from archwiki.
    Of course, already doing that. Low profile and powersave governor. Still both parts run pretty hot.

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