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Thread: Linux 3.10 May Have New Multi-Platform Support

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  1. #1
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    Default Linux 3.10 May Have New Multi-Platform Support

    Phoronix: Linux 3.10 May Have New Multi-Platform Support

    The Linux 3.7 kernel brought ARM multi-platform support and now with the Linux 3.10 kernel it may be extended to support the Samsung Exynos SoC family...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTM0ODQ

  2. #2
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    Just a correction in the article, the Nexus 7 has a Tegra 3. I think you meant to say the Nexus 10, which has the Exynos 5250.

  3. #3
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    Can someone a bit more knowledgeable than me clarify what this means please.

    Does this mean that I can compile a kernel image from the same source code for both say a desktop x86 machine and one of these SoCs? Or does it mean that the same kernel image will work on both a x86 machine and on one of these SoCs after it's been compiled?

    Or have I completely missed the point?

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by kaprikawn View Post
    Can someone a bit more knowledgeable than me clarify what this means please.

    Does this mean that I can compile a kernel image from the same source code for both say a desktop x86 machine and one of these SoCs? Or does it mean that the same kernel image will work on both a x86 machine and on one of these SoCs after it's been compiled?

    Or have I completely missed the point?
    A x86 image has always run on all x86 machines.
    ARM has been a mess, and a image compiled for ARM only worked one one board, not other ARM boards.
    So with this, you compile one ARM image that runs on many ARM boards.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by uid313 View Post
    A x86 image has always run on all x86 machines.
    ARM has been a mess, and a image compiled for ARM only worked one one board, not other ARM boards.
    So with this, you compile one ARM image that runs on many ARM boards.
    What about drivers? Each ARM SoC contains a ton of vastly different components like GPU cores, WiFi radios, GSM radios, modems, etc etc...

    Even within one SoC family (eg: Exynos) different versions have different components.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sonadow View Post
    What about drivers? Each ARM SoC contains a ton of vastly different components like GPU cores, WiFi radios, GSM radios, modems, etc etc...

    Even within one SoC family (eg: Exynos) different versions have different components.
    Then a multi-platform kernel image with all those drivers compiled in can be quite big for an embedded board.

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