Page 14 of 20 FirstFirst ... 41213141516 ... LastLast
Results 131 to 140 of 194

Thread: Steam Linux Usage Still On The Decline

  1. #131
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    366

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Calinou View Post
    But it's still patented crap. DVI/DP for the win.
    DP isn't supported by most receivers; neither is DVI for that matter. Nevermind DVI can't carry an audio stream. [OK, the spec says it CAN, but no one uses it that way]

    Well yeah, deal with it, that's laptops.
    And this is the mindset that ensures Linux will forever hold a ~2% market share.

    Stop listening to marketing BS: you can perfectly live without a dedicated sound card, a good integrated sound card ought to be enough for everybody.
    Integrated is crap. Plain and simple. No dynamic range to speak of. Any decent audio gear chokes to death when using it.

    I'm currently using an Audio Technica m50s; I plan to move up to AKG Q701 in the near future. And trust me, the m50 is unlistenable when using onboard.

    50Mb/s, not more than 1Gb/s. On top of that your router and cable probably doesn't support 10Gb/s Ethernet.
    The point isn't bandwidth; the onboard Intel ethernet chipset does NOT do well once you hit 30Mb/sec; its performance literally falls off a cliff. That's why I HAVE to use a dedicated card.

    But hey, keep making excuses to not support hardware. Thats cool.

  2. #132
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Rural Alberta, Canada
    Posts
    1,058

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by startzz View Post
    Lol what a noob your childhood must have been really hard, doesnt it ?
    He has become almost like a pantomime of a real poster now.

  3. #133
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    135

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by gamerk2 View Post
    And this is the mindset that ensures Linux will forever hold a ~2% market share.
    Well yes, that says pretty much everything about linux, and whos here trolling, even if its free, nobody wants it... Of course, i got all windows versions for free legally, so windows vs linux is getting even more onesided match
    Last edited by startzz; 05-06-2013 at 03:29 PM.

  4. #134
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    304

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by startzz View Post
    Lol, why linux users just cant admit, that their os will never be equal to windows in terms of user expeirence, performance and gaming ? Why you always have to blame other stuff, like hardware ? And linux is open source, you know, so why dont you go and develop drivers yourself ? Why do even need linux to be open source, if you cant do shit with it ?
    As someone who occasionally install Windows system from scratch, I can tell you Microsoft heavily relied on third parties support (including drivers) to make it optimal. Try using stock Windows 8 i.e. non OEM specific for gaming and see how far you can go.

  5. #135
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    304

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by vyrgozunqk View Post
    Well i i'm using linux for more than 7 years, but i still dualboot and i wont use steam for linux, because linux GPU drivers for ATI Suck, they just don't exist...

    All open source drivers are total crap and useless, and proprietary blob is just far behind windows! ( thanks kernel devs, gpl fanatics...) Anyway, i won't buy hardware for the software, i preffer to buy software for the hardware i have !
    You forgot a detail. Try to use an stock ATI Windows driver that comes withing the installer without any third party like AMD and Nvidia, come back with the same statement.

    So it's normal to stay for gaming on windows...
    Even the wi-fi drivers are bad, and can often drop your network, add more lag and etc.
    That is because Windows relies on third parties which is why most of preinstalled system are done by OEM. Try installing with stock Windows and see how far you can play heavily hardware accelerated games.

  6. #136
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Camarillo, CA
    Posts
    77

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by kdekorte View Post
    I was hoping Steam would make Torchlight available for Linux, but so far it does not seem to be there. Also I accidentally purchased Torchlight 2 because I thought it would work with Linux, but I was wrong. So I wonder how many Linux users have done that.
    What? I remembered playing Torchlight on linux a long time ago. Just to double check again to see if I was remembering wrongly right now I just loaded it up and put it on full settings and it ran fine.
    64 bit AMD 6 core 3.2ghz with a Nvidia gtx 460 and running Mex from http://linux.exton.net/ with 3.8 kernel (he compiled it and notified that kernel release on his facebook) which has like every desktop and right now I chose the plasma desktop.
    Last edited by aironeous; 05-06-2013 at 05:05 PM.

  7. #137
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    411

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by gamerk2 View Post
    The point isn't bandwidth; the onboard Intel ethernet chipset does NOT do well once you hit 30Mb/sec; its performance literally falls off a cliff. That's why I HAVE to use a dedicated card.
    And that explains exactly why you need a 10 GB/s card and why a 1 GB/s card doesn't suit you. But hey buddy, keep on trolling!

    //EDIT:
    But hey, keep making excuses to not support hardware. Thats cool.
    It's not like Linux doesn't support the hardware, it's exactly the other way around: The hardware (vendor) doesn't support Linux. But that has been explained a lot, so learn to read.
    Last edited by TAXI; 05-06-2013 at 05:07 PM.

  8. #138
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    366

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by finalzone View Post
    As someone who occasionally install Windows system from scratch, I can tell you Microsoft heavily relied on third parties support (including drivers) to make it optimal. Try using stock Windows 8 i.e. non OEM specific for gaming and see how far you can go.
    Just fine actually. Build most every PC from scratch, and haven't had any major problems for years.

    Drivers are a non-issue for the most part now; most every major component out there has WHQL certified drivers at release, so they automatically download/install on PC boot. Its rare I have to hunt down drivers theres days.

    Quote Originally Posted by TAXI View Post
    And that explains exactly why you need a 10 GB/s card and why a 1 GB/s card doesn't suit you. But hey buddy, keep on trolling!
    1: As I said, the Intel onboard Ethernet port dies at about 30Mb/sec or so. No idea why at this stage, but doesn't seem driver related. Hence the discrete card.

    2: Note that you seem rather insistent to turn the conversation away from the fact the HW isn't supported in Linux. Sorry, but deflection isn't going to work on me. People aren't going to switch if they find their HW isn't supported.

    It's not like Linux doesn't support the hardware, it's exactly the other way around: The hardware (vendor) doesn't support Linux. But that has been explained a lot, so learn to read.
    For the end user, its the same thing.

    And again, the reason devs like me avoid Linux is partially because you can't maintain a stable ABI for any length of time, and also because the GPL series of licenses are the absolute worst licenses on the planet from a developer perspective. Throw in the fragmentation (why does it work in Ubuntu and not Fedora?) and marketshare, it simply isn't profitable to support Linux. Its really that simple. And, as has been noted, there aren't enough people with enough time to provide full support for every piece of HW on the market. Hence the current state of Linux.

    If you want Linux to get my attention, do the following:
    1: Freeze the ABI and API. No removes from this point forward.
    2: Force all distros to have some baseline test for program compatibility out of the box; there is no reason why Distro "A" can run something right after install and Distro "B" can not.
    3: Switch to a non-GPL license. GPL and variants are non-starters for developers.

  9. #139
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    135

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by TAXI View Post
    //EDIT:

    It's not like Linux doesn't support the hardware, it's exactly the other way around: The hardware (vendor) doesn't support Linux. But that has been explained a lot, so learn to read.
    But hey, this is the most stupid thing i've ever heard isnt linux motto "do yourself" ? And why no one of you "great-linux-minds-trollers" dont write drivers yourself, isnt open-source thing wasted with that atitude ?

    And by the way, even if you install i.e. graphics drivers from vendor, its most likely something will broke... Not to mention how hard it is to install those drivers, the process is just absurd even for linux.

  10. #140
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    135

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by finalzone View Post
    As someone who occasionally install Windows system from scratch, I can tell you Microsoft heavily relied on third parties support (including drivers) to make it optimal. Try using stock Windows 8 i.e. non OEM specific for gaming and see how far you can go.
    Well, i can go as far as my hardware can, so i dont see any problem there

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •