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Thread: Comparing The Ubuntu And Fedora Linux Kernels

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
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    519

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    Quote Originally Posted by Grogan View Post
    That is the "special way". The only thing you're not doing their way, is using unpatched kernel source. As I said, I don't like having to use an initrd image (you would find that Fedora/Redhat won't boot without one) and I like my main drivers all built right in my kernel image. Disk controllers, hard disk filesystems... anything needed for serious functioning even if something happens to the modules tree, or module-init-tools programs or whatever. Stuff like audio, CDROM, and various other non hardware stuff that's just used as needed can be modules.

    make menuconfig
    make
    cp arch/x86/boot/bzImage /boot/vmlinuz-x.x.xx
    make modules_install
    cp System.map /boot/System.map-x.x.xx

    I still use LILO too... I prefer its simplicity and (as I like to say) it has no choice but to work.

    I still like things the old way and to address "having too much time on my hands", I make the time for my own workstation to have the best possible software environment for myself, including custom compiled packages for the system, libraries and any software that I use.

    Laptop on the other hand... I use Sabayon on it. Custom kernel (my way) and a few other things, but distro packages for everything else. I need more of a fast food type distro there, because I don't have time to compile shit on low end hardware and I need the convenience of things like a graphical network manager because I'm always configuring routers and other networking equipment and need to change network and settings a lot.
    if you use backported drivers such as compat-wireless you will find that building drivers software stacks inside the kernel and not as modules is a huge no-no. Compat-wireless demands that the kernel's entire networking stack be built as a module, and if you build it into the kernel compat-wireless will not even proceed past the ./configure stage and you'd have no choice but to build a new modularized kernel.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    90

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sonadow View Post
    if you use backported drivers such as compat-wireless you will find that building drivers software stacks inside the kernel and not as modules is a huge no-no. Compat-wireless demands that the kernel's entire networking stack be built as a module, and if you build it into the kernel compat-wireless will not even proceed past the ./configure stage and you'd have no choice but to build a new modularized kernel.
    I do the wireless stack as modules, though I haven't had to do any third party drivers in a long time. I was more talking about my workstations where I build my network driver in (ethernet).

    I once found that I had to build the ethernet driver as a module in Redhat, or the network wouldn't come up after the reboot. That sucked... I thought I was doing a good thing building it in (this was back when it wasn't unusual to do that) but I had to get a physical reboot at the datacenter and then figure out what went wrong. The worst of it was it wasn't my server, I was doing it for someone else so I had to get them to call. Anyway, the driver was right there in kernel but Redhat wouldn't use it. I think that's because of the silly way they were using module aliases at the time. Calling the module alias both loads the module and is involved in initializing the network. (many years ago, and I can't remember the fine details)

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Vilnius, Lithuania
    Posts
    2,520

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    Quote Originally Posted by Grogan View Post
    make menuconfig
    make
    cp arch/x86/boot/bzImage /boot/vmlinuz-x.x.xx
    make modules_install
    cp System.map /boot/System.map-x.x.xx
    I think you can safely substitute the two cps with `make install`. Also, I could never stand menuconfig. As opposed to nconfig, which is much less annoying and also offers the F* keys for use.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    1,303

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    Quote Originally Posted by n3wu53r View Post
    You sound like you'd like Gentoo.
    He actually sounds like he'd like LFS

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