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Thread: Color Management Code Merged Into Wayland/Weston

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  1. #1
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    Default Color Management Code Merged Into Wayland/Weston

    Phoronix: Color Management Code Merged Into Wayland/Weston

    Support for color management has been merged into Wayland's Weston compositor...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTM2OTQ

  2. #2
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    Default Richard Hughes

    Richard Hughes is also the guy behind the ColorHug colorimeter device.

    He also have contributed to the GNOME color calibration software, I believe.

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    The bigger news is that someone from the Enlightenment camp expressed interest in implementing the minimize thing after the whole drama with Scott and the rest of the devs. I think this is the only thing missing from having an X less Enlightenment.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 89c51 View Post
    The bigger news is that someone from the Enlightenment camp expressed interest in implementing the minimize thing after the whole drama with Scott and the rest of the devs. I think this is the only thing missing from having an X less Enlightenment.
    Un-fullscreening isnt implemented yet either (not sure if its on the E side or the Wayland side though...) The e18 release manager blog said they were missing un-fullscreening (and because undoing it isn't available, theyve disabled fullscreening to prevent complaints).

    Do you have a link to where they said they'd handle writing the minimize code for Wayland? I haven't heard any news yet.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ericg View Post
    Un-fullscreening isnt implemented yet either (not sure if its on the E side or the Wayland side though...) The e18 release manager blog said they were missing un-fullscreening (and because undoing it isn't available, theyve disabled fullscreening to prevent complaints).

    Do you have a link to where they said they'd handle writing the minimize code for Wayland? I haven't heard any news yet.
    http://lists.freedesktop.org/archive...ay/009093.html

    Rafael is an E dev.
    Last edited by 89c51; 05-10-2013 at 02:53 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 89c51 View Post
    For anyone who that link craps out for, just drop the trailing "\" in the URL bar.

    Is Rafael talking about implementing minimize at the protocol level or just at the weston level? Because I thought the wayland devs were still arguing about the best way to handle minimize at the protocol level-- thereby making any weston work pointless

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    Quote Originally Posted by uid313 View Post
    Richard Hughes is also the guy behind the ColorHug colorimeter device.

    He also have contributed to the GNOME color calibration software, I believe.
    He's a big contributor to OSS. He's behind packagekit and various parts of the power management stack. He's also, I believe, helping with the cross-distro install system AppStream.
    Lastly, he's mentioned the possibility of a new colorhug. A more professional version, if the current model does well enough (which, from last I heard, it seems to be doing).

    BTW, I love the fact that color management is built into the protocol. That should make for a nice, consistent experience.

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    Quote Originally Posted by liam View Post
    He's a big contributor to OSS. He's behind packagekit and various parts of the power management stack. He's also, I believe, helping with the cross-distro install system AppStream.
    Lastly, he's mentioned the possibility of a new colorhug. A more professional version, if the current model does well enough (which, from last I heard, it seems to be doing).

    BTW, I love the fact that color management is built into the protocol. That should make for a nice, consistent experience.
    Not afraid to claim ignorance here... How exactly does Color Management work? With Wayland especially. Wayland's mandate is: every frame is perfect. I know this was more meant in the idea of tearing, but wouldn't that extend to "Every pixel is perfect"? Meaning: "Every pixel is exactly how the client meant for it to be drawn." So why would you need Color Management anyway? I guess color management would be useful for visually impaired users (flipping all colors to be the inverse in black and white)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ericg View Post
    Not afraid to claim ignorance here... How exactly does Color Management work? With Wayland especially. Wayland's mandate is: every frame is perfect. I know this was more meant in the idea of tearing, but wouldn't that extend to "Every pixel is perfect"? Meaning: "Every pixel is exactly how the client meant for it to be drawn." So why would you need Color Management anyway? I guess color management would be useful for visually impaired users (flipping all colors to be the inverse in black and white)
    Color management doesn't help if all you want to say is simply "draw that pixel at R=25, G=27, B=105".

    Where it helps is when you want to display say a JPEG that is tagged with color info. In that case, there will be a table which essentially says: here is how to convert RGB values (which have no INTRINSIC ie OBJECTIVE meaning) into specific frequencies and amplitudes of light (ie something that is objective).
    The color management software takes that table, uses it in conjunction with a table associated with the display device (which likewise says how specific RGB values sent to it will translate into specific frequencies of light appearing on the device), and maps each pixel in the JPEG through these tables. The end result, when done properly, is that the JPEG will appear the same on all screens, and the way it looked when the image was captured. (Subject, of course, to HW limitations.)

    Likewise when you now want to print your JPEG.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ericg View Post
    "Every pixel is perfect"? ..... So why would you need Color Management anyway?
    Because nearly every monitor is imperfect and it is allot easier to try to get the colors on you display to display properly using software, than trying to do it by pushing the buttons on your monitor. (Smaller increments, also there is hardware to help automate the process if you have the cash).

    People who do photo editing professionally consider it a big deal to have their monitor show the same colors that their prints.

    Hoped that helped.

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