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Thread: DRM Moves Ahead With HTML5 Specification

  1. #91
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    Quote Originally Posted by dee. View Post
    Yes, that is why I'm saying free sharing for noncommercial purposes needs to be legalized. That still wouldn't abolish copyright entirely, and it wouldn't allow someone to take whatever content and sell it for profit without the author's permission. So the scenario you describe couldn't happen legally.
    What would you make of people that profit from "sharing for noncommercial purpose"? like a torrent website, or usenet providers and filelockers. Or say, the paid employees of a non-profit dedicated to sharing other's work? (honest question)

  2. #92
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sonadow View Post
    Can you think of a better way to stop people from pirating content?

    Even humble indie bundle games get pirated.
    And still they make lots of money. And one of the reasons for that is that they do NOT have DRM.

    Stopping people from pirating is a useless goal in itself. There is no value in it.

    The only useful goal is getting people to pay for your content. It is irrelevant how many people have your content without paying. The only number which counts is the number of people who pay for your content. I rather have 7 billion people copy my content without paying and 100 million buying it, than having no one copying my content and 10 million buying it. Because in the first case I get 10x as much money!

    So the question is how to make people pay. If you cannot use force, then this question transforms to the question how to make people *want to* pay. And artists have invented lots of ways to achieve that over the years. Hint: The central trick is to get fans who want you to keep working. Kickstarter shows how much untapped potential is in that.

    One example: Over 150 000$ for fan-coins - on a fundraiser where the artist hoped to get about 2000$ to be able to start producing them: http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/...hallenge-coins

    Another example: Over 300 000$ for a leather-bound deluxe edition of a roleplaying book where the artists hoped for 60 000$ - and RPGs are notoriously known for not being able to feed their developers: http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/...ed-3rd-edition and still 29 days to go.

  3. #93
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    Quote Originally Posted by ArneBab View Post
    And still they make lots of money. And one of the reasons for that is that they do NOT have DRM.

    Stopping people from pirating is a useless goal in itself. There is no value in it.

    The only useful goal is getting people to pay for your content. It is irrelevant how many people have your content without paying. The only number which counts is the number of people who pay for your content. I rather have 7 billion people copy my content without paying and 100 million buying it, than having no one copying my content and 10 million buying it. Because in the first case I get 10x as much money!

    So the question is how to make people pay. If you cannot use force, then this question transforms to the question how to make people *want to* pay. And artists have invented lots of ways to achieve that over the years. Hint: The central trick is to get fans who want you to keep working. Kickstarter shows how much untapped potential is in that.

    One example: Over 150 000$ for fan-coins - on a fundraiser where the artist hoped to get about 2000$ to be able to start producing them: http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/...hallenge-coins

    Another example: Over 300 000$ for a leather-bound deluxe edition of a roleplaying book where the artists hoped for 60 000$ - and RPGs are notoriously known for not being able to feed their developers: http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/...ed-3rd-edition — and still 29 days to go.
    Funding is different from earning.

    Getting $xxx,xxx for funding needed to produce something is just that; funding.

    When the product is finished you SELL the finished product to earn money off the fruits of the labour. Piracy destroys this big time. This is why content producers are being tough on this: they poured in money to fund their contracted artists/developers/etc etc to do something, and to advertise + market the product and to patent / license / protect its assets and what not. This funding stretches well into the tens of millions to hundreds of millions of dollars. They have every right to recoup the money spent on funding and to turn a profit to remain in business.
    Last edited by Sonadow; 05-14-2013 at 11:03 AM.

  4. #94
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sonadow View Post
    Funding is different from earning.

    Getting $xxx,xxx for funding needed to produce something is just that; funding.

    When the product is finished you SELL the finished product to earn money off the fruits of the labour. Piracy destroys this big time. This is why content producers are being tough on this: they poured in money to fund their contracted artists/developers/etc etc to do something, and to advertise + market the product and to patent / license / protect its assets and what not. This funding stretches well into the tens of millions to hundreds of millions of dollars. They have every right to recoup the money spent on funding and to turn a profit to remain in business.
    No, Piracy does not destroy selling stuff. That is a myth perpetrated by people who don’t care about money, but about control. See http://www.michaelgeist.ca/content/view/6699/125/ for actual numbers from a pro-industry group. People who pirate buy more than people who don’t.

    And for the rights I disagree, too: There is no such thing like a natural right to forbid others to copy something they have. There are state granted monopoly rights to support the creation of cultural works, but they are only legitimate as long as they actually help culture. and as the stats I liked above show, keeping people from sharing does not help artists or rigthsholders to earn more money. So these monopolies should be abolished.

  5. #95
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    There wouldn't be so much pirating if there wasn't so much copyright.

  6. #96
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prescience500 View Post
    There wouldn't be so much pirating if there wasn't so much copyright.
    Well of course it's just like any other commodity, if you want to eliminate a black market you heavily deregulate. Deregulate does not equal devalue. If the content industry can learn to exploit the value of the products in a deregulated environment then they will be successful. It does present a paradigm shift.
    Last edited by duby229; 05-18-2013 at 08:19 PM.

  7. #97
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    Quote Originally Posted by brosis View Post
    Now, cough out $3,000,000,000 for your DRMed copy of Linux kernel or you are douchebag.
    If Linux devs asked money for each copy then - if it had still managed to become worth it without the community - we'd all be paying for it. Copying Linux isn't pirating because they're not demanding that you pay for copies. Not a difficult concept.

    And of course most Linux developers are being recompensed for their work in some way either because they're paid to do so (because is useful for commercial enterprise unlike most media/games which are just for personal enjoyment) or because they enjoy working on the project in their spare time while someone else pays them for something else (because, unlike a game or most other media, you can dick around with software like Linux for a few hours/week and actually make progress without being a blocker for everyone else who wants to work on it). Compare to most game devs who work 40-80 hours/week and have no way to make a living besides getting paid for that work. You can't work just 4 hours/week in your spare time while having a job as an IT admin or something when making modern-quality games because tons of people are dependent on you completing features or fixing bugs or creating content in a very rapid manner in order to facilitate their own work and it's hard enough to keep things moving and getting a game out the door in 2 years when folks "only" work 40 hours/week (hence why a ton of game companies still cling to frequent long-term "crunch time" despite the proven loss of work quality and morale it leads to).

    LMAO "hard work" - every work is hard. The difference is, if you ain't popular and unique, your "hard work" does not interest ANYONE, especially if you restrict it yourself how to distribute it.
    If you pirate it then it must be interesting to you. If you don't think it has worth then don't fucking download it. Pay for it or completely ignore it. Simple.

    If you submit that the media (which you don't need to live or enjoy life and is in no way something you must acquire) is not worth the asked-for price then the ethical option is to boycott it until publishers come around to your way of thinking, not to expend time and effort to consume it (proving it must have value) without paying what is asked and then illogically claiming that the media was somehow without worth.

    By pirating you claim that yes you think the media is desirable but that no you won't pay unless you're forced to. Hence DRM and free-to-play. It stops casual stealing cheapasses from freely giving away for-pay media (which they think are fun and hence worth something) to their friends. DRM is intended to force you to pay, free-to-play is intended to shift value from the game itself to some virtual item or privilege on a remote server you can't possibly acquire without playing by the rules. Free-to-play at least fits into an economic model for some types of games that is more beneficial to customers than the traditional sales model but approaches like DRM are going to remain relevant for purely single-player games for which the game/media itself is the only thing there is to sell.

  8. #98
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    Quote Originally Posted by elanthis View Post
    If you pirate it then it must be interesting to you. If you don't think it has worth then don't fucking download it. Pay for it or completely ignore it. Simple.
    What if it is worth 1 cent to me, but no one wants to give it to me for 1 cent, even though that would not cost them anything? Essentially they do not want to take my money.

  9. #99
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    If you pirate it then it must be interesting to you. If you don't think it has worth then don't fucking download it. Pay for it or completely ignore it. Simple.
    How can you tell if it has worth, if it has no demo, or the demo is not representative?

    Reviews are not the answer.

  10. #100
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    Quote Originally Posted by curaga View Post
    How can you tell if it has worth, if it has no demo, or the demo is not representative?
    That could be used as a justification for pirating the first episode or two of a tv series, but by the time you're downloading the 20th of 24 episode I think it would be wearing a bit thin.

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