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Thread: Mir Still Causing Concerns By Ubuntu Derivatives

  1. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by bartek View Post
    I dont care about fracture, Im an end user. i just want a system that serves my needs. I want to use my smartphone as my desktop computer. At this point Ubuntu is the only one to give my needs a go. If they feel Mir is the way to go ... So be it.
    If that's the way that you feel, then why are you even commenting on this subject at all? None of this will matter to you at all, Ubuntu is just going to do whatever they want, and that's what you will use as a user. What does it matter what the Ubuntu derivatives think or do?

  2. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by BO$$ View Post
    You assume that Ubuntu Software Center only works on Ubuntu because Canonical is evil when most likely it works only on their distro because they don't bother to make it work on others. It would take a lot more work to make it as distro agnostic as possible and then maintain it along with all the data of every user's download list. It wouldn't be impossible of course but they don't want to focus on that. They have a lot to get done in a short amount of time. Better focus on what it will gain them the largest market share possible for now.
    They wouldn't have so much to get done if management didn't insist their software developers re-invent the wheel.

  3. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by bartek View Post

    I dont care about fracture, Im an end user. i just want a system that serves my needs. I want to use my smartphone as my desktop computer.
    One question: Why?

    So let's put aside all issues of compatibility between different CPU architectures - let's ignore the fact that you can't run x86 binaries on any ARM-based CPUs (which means, pretty much, no games, no proprietary software, unless the developers specifically port those applications)... let's even graciously assume that the ARM platform will become powerful enough to run those applications, and that the mobile smartphone GPUs will become powerful enough to support all desktop needs. Let's even ignore the fact that most ARM-applications, for now, are developed for one or two platforms - Android and iOS, neither of which can be run on Ubuntu, due to Canonical stupidly deciding not to implement Android-compatibility.

    Even then, the question remains: why? You come home, and want to use your desktop, with the comfortable and ergonomic interface that the combination of a keyboard, a large screen and a mouse provides. You then have to hook up your smartphone to all of these things, by some kind of interface that combines HDMI and at least several counts of USB... and then, the piddling 64 GiB storage space of your smartphone gets used up, and you need more space. Add another peripheral, an external harddrive.

    Wouldn't it at this point be easier to simply have a separate desktop computer which you can connect your phone to? That way you can even use both independently. After all, you already need the space for your monitor, keyboard and mouse, so a slim router-sized mini-desktop unit won't be much of an issue space-wise. The whole smartphone-as-desktop-computer seems like an ill-thought-out concept that serves no purpose and solves problems that no one has. No wonder it has never become popular.

    At this point Ubuntu is the only one to give my needs a go. If they feel Mir is the way to go ... So be it.
    If Ubuntu jumps off a bridge, will you do it too?

  4. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by dee. View Post
    One question: Why?

    So let's put aside all issues of compatibility between different CPU architectures - let's ignore the fact that you can't run x86 binaries on any ARM-based CPUs (which means, pretty much, no games, no proprietary software, unless the developers specifically port those applications)... let's even graciously assume that the ARM platform will become powerful enough to run those applications, and that the mobile smartphone GPUs will become powerful enough to support all desktop needs. Let's even ignore the fact that most ARM-applications, for now, are developed for one or two platforms - Android and iOS, neither of which can be run on Ubuntu, due to Canonical stupidly deciding not to implement Android-compatibility.

    Even then, the question remains: why? You come home, and want to use your desktop, with the comfortable and ergonomic interface that the combination of a keyboard, a large screen and a mouse provides. You then have to hook up your smartphone to all of these things, by some kind of interface that combines HDMI and at least several counts of USB... and then, the piddling 64 GiB storage space of your smartphone gets used up, and you need more space. Add another peripheral, an external harddrive.

    Wouldn't it at this point be easier to simply have a separate desktop computer which you can connect your phone to? That way you can even use both independently. After all, you already need the space for your monitor, keyboard and mouse, so a slim router-sized mini-desktop unit won't be much of an issue space-wise. The whole smartphone-as-desktop-computer seems like an ill-thought-out concept that serves no purpose and solves problems that no one has. No wonder it has never become popular.
    Convenience is an answer to why. The same apps (which is possible with FOSS or web based stuff) and familiarity. Possible use cases: Use your mobile phone to make a presentation, plug it in a monitor/keyboard and have a full (although limited) desktop (or even remote desk from your PC) away from your desktop PC. If you add seamless syncing with your desktop PC (NFC tap and sync over wifi or something) when you have something really good. Someone needs to do this IMO.

  5. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by 89c51 View Post
    Convenience is an answer to why. The same apps (which is possible with FOSS or web based stuff) and familiarity. Possible use cases: Use your mobile phone to make a presentation, plug it in a monitor/keyboard and have a full (although limited) desktop (or even remote desk from your PC) away from your desktop PC. If you add seamless syncing with your desktop PC (NFC tap and sync over wifi or something) when you have something really good. Someone needs to do this IMO.
    I don't follow. You can already have the same apps and familiarity by just installing the same apps on both devices. About the presentation: if it will need a special dock, then it's a no-go; if it won't, then the phone will have to have a bunch of USB and HDMI ports. Then you will also have to hope that whatever monitor you're trying to use actually has an HDMI connection. If you're using a projector, even more so. Pretty sure there won't be a VGA or DVI ports even on a dock, or otherwise it would be too big. As for syncing what desktop PC, if you're intending to use the phone as a desktop?

  6. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by GreatEmerald View Post
    I don't follow. You can already have the same apps and familiarity by just installing the same apps on both devices. About the presentation: if it will need a special dock, then it's a no-go; if it won't, then the phone will have to have a bunch of USB and HDMI ports. Then you will also have to hope that whatever monitor you're trying to use actually has an HDMI connection. If you're using a projector, even more so. Pretty sure there won't be a VGA or DVI ports even on a dock, or otherwise it would be too big. As for syncing what desktop PC, if you're intending to use the phone as a desktop?
    Yes some technical issues exist (connections with screens/projector mainly). The idea is to be able to use your mobile as a pc away from your pc. (inb4 everyone has a laptop ) Or standalone if you don't do heavy stuff. Therefore you "need" to have the option on launching a full desktop when you plug a screen to it.

  7. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by Awesomeness View Post
    How and why?
    A) Canonical does not want a stable interface to Mir. It would have to be a cat and mouse game chasing Canonical's erratic interface changes of Mir.
    B) Mir has zero technological benefit over Wayland. In fact is way behind in development compared to Wayland.
    Canonical is so full of BS it's not funny as you will see Wayland will end up having a huge technological benefit over Mir to the point developers will pick Wayland over Mir any day of the week "server-side *only* had performance/power benefits on certain ARM chips, on x86 client-side is preferred" now that moblie is moving into x86 and Mir aim is ARM it will take a lost once more, just wait for Amd and intel to kill off ARM, the funny part is MS has did more to the Linux Kernal then Canonical

  8. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by 89c51 View Post
    (inb4 everyone has a laptop )
    Netbook!

  9. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by 89c51 View Post
    Convenience is an answer to why. The same apps (which is possible with FOSS or web based stuff) and familiarity. Possible use cases: Use your mobile phone to make a presentation, plug it in a monitor/keyboard and have a full (although limited) desktop (or even remote desk from your PC) away from your desktop PC. If you add seamless syncing with your desktop PC (NFC tap and sync over wifi or something) when you have something really good. Someone needs to do this IMO.
    Same apps - you can already run the same apps on the desktop even without having the phone be your desktop. Especially if it's FOSS or web based stuff. I fail to see how that is an argument for using your phone as desktop computer.
    Using phone to have a presentation - again runs to the same issue: if the presentation place already has to have a keyboard, mouse, monitor - why not also have the CPU? With miniature desktop kits and all-in-ones becoming more prominent, it's becoming easier to put the CPU in the monitor, keyboard or heck, why not the mouse. If the CPU can fit in a phone, it can fit into any of those. And you'd still have the option to plug in your phone and remote to it from the desktop.

    Your arguments are good if you're arguing for having good, open remote/sync protocols between the desktop and phone, but having the phone act as the desktop CPU itself (which was the original argument) still makes no sense.

  10. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by BO$$ View Post
    Diverging from linux is a good thing. Linux itself isn't that great for the end user and they are focused on these users and try to fill their needs. This can be done by trying to convince the linux people that that is what users want or they can do it themselves and let other complain how it's not fair that they don't contribute upstream. They chose the second one because they don't want to wait another 10 years for the stallman freaks to wake up.
    Do you jackasses even know what Linux is? If you mean diverging from other operation systems that use the Linux kernel then you (read: Ubuntu) should stop using the Linux kernel because that's what most of these (including Andoid) share. The faster people understand Ubuntu != "Linux" the better, it's iconoclastic behavior is detrimental.

    Most of what I wanted to say GreatEmerald already did for me however I wish you Ubuntu trolls luck, it's going to be an uphill battle I think.

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