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Thread: Doing More For An Open NVIDIA

  1. #11
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    Well, as for me and my U3S, everything works excellently except for a built-in GPS module (which I have not tried to investigate into very much, though). There is not much to be done to let Linux work on their hardware for ASUS, as far as I can see. If an issue is present in some distro and is absent in others, it is a problem of the distro, not the hardware manufacturer, imho.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by alchark View Post
    Well, as for me and my U3S, everything works excellently except for a built-in GPS module (which I have not tried to investigate into very much, though). There is not much to be done to let Linux work on their hardware for ASUS, as far as I can see. If an issue is present in some distro and is absent in others, it is a problem of the distro, not the hardware manufacturer, imho.
    Right but you have to have the support staff that is trained and knowledgeable in these things which would require them to stay cutting edge and in the current know to make such a determination. With windows it is easy to determine what maybe a hardware/software issue as you have rather static OS that a "known good" configuration is easily fallen back on to make such a determination. Which is easier? Shooting at a static target or skeet?

  3. #13
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    Strictly speaking, I have been warned by the "Supported OSes" section on their site that only states "Windows Vista" And yes, I understand perfectly that claiming Linux-compatibility has its costs (presumably large). On the other hand, the issue that we are discussing here is not associated in an obvious way with any direct costs to ASUS other than just contacting nVidia with the FOSS driver request. Both companies could have gained better Linux-users' attitude if ASUS managed to bring the request to nVidia's attention and the latter responded.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by alchark View Post
    And yes, I understand perfectly that claiming Linux-compatibility has its costs (presumably large).
    Extremely large, many countries have consumer laws that if you advertise a feature your legally liable for that feature. Not to mention having the support structure there to undertake such an offering.


    On the other hand, the issue that we are discussing here is not associated in an obvious way with any direct costs to ASUS other than just contacting nVidia with the FOSS driver request. Both companies could have gained better Linux-users' attitude if ASUS managed to bring the request to nVidia's attention and the latter responded.
    The people that are most concerned about that are coders. Coders, even in the linux world, still makes up a small percentage of end users (although it being percentage wise greater then windows). The majority of end users simply want stuff to work, and still to this day Nvidia's blob offers the best end user experience in linux. If you want FOSS drivers for nvidia, the way to get it is simple, have a competitor not only match Nvidia's performance but exceed it enough that it starts taking over Nvidia's reputation as the best performing card for linux.
    Last edited by deanjo; 03-17-2008 at 06:25 PM.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by deanjo View Post
    The majority of end users simply want stuff to work, and still to this day Nvidia's blob offers the best end user experience in linux.
    What about out-of-box experience with Linux? Many distros can not include non-free drivers in their default configuration for legal reasons. That is what end users WILL notice and suffer from.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by deanjo View Post
    If you want FOSS drivers for nvidia, the way to get it is simple, have a competitor not only match Nvidia's performance but exceed it enough that it starts taking over Nvidia's reputation as the best performing card for linux.
    Yep. That would be the case. Now that AMD has released most of the needed info, all we need to do is have Gallium3D support show up quickly on the parts as that'll be the way to that position to harry NVidia with FOSS drivers.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by alchark View Post
    What about out-of-box experience with Linux? Many distros can not include non-free drivers in their default configuration for legal reasons. That is what end users WILL notice and suffer from.
    Most distro's have a easy simple way of installing the drivers. One click installs are easily found. Just like windows for which people are already accustomed too. You don't see people running away and screaming because they have to install the latest and greatest drivers. What happens if I buy a card that happens to be newer then the drivers found on the distro? I still have to connect to the net and update everything.


    Svartalf, ATI/AMD's efforts still have a long way to go before they match Nvidia. They not only have to match the single card video performance, but now they also have to be able to compete with SLI, Cuda and Physix.
    Last edited by deanjo; 03-17-2008 at 06:40 PM.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by deanjo View Post
    Svartalf, ATI/AMD's efforts still have a long way to go before they match Nvidia. They not only have to match the single card video performance, but now they also have to be able to compete with SLI, Cuda and Physix.
    I won't argue that. But...have you read up on what Tungsten's doing with Gallium? If you have, you might want to think about what everything but SLI/Crossfire means in that context. It's the only sticking point in the picture I paint. If you've not read up, I suggest a bit of light reading might be in order...

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Svartalf View Post
    I won't argue that. But...have you read up on what Tungsten's doing with Gallium? If you have, you might want to think about what everything but SLI/Crossfire means in that context. It's the only sticking point in the picture I paint. If you've not read up, I suggest a bit of light reading might be in order...

    Yes I've read it, fact still remains, Nvidia has working solutions now. Gallium is still more or less a paper launch in it's infancy that has a long way to go as well to become a defacto standard. I remember seeing much of this type of hype when openAL was announced as well but it took Windows Vista to bring it into the limelight.

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