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Thread: Glibc 2.18 Supports New Optimizations, New Archs

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    Default Glibc 2.18 Supports New Optimizations, New Archs

    Phoronix: Glibc 2.18 Supports New Optimizations, New Archs

    Version 2.18 of glibc is available and with it comes a host of new features, new architectures are supported, and various bug-fixes...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTQzNDk

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    Cortex-strings finally upstream! Good news, though it took Canonical years.

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    Yet another backward incompatible release? Yeah, sure, that's why ISVs "love" Linux.

    Why not do it Microsoft's way?

    E.g. they have MSVC 2005/2008/2010/2012 - i.e. as separate libraries, so that even if you link to them (e.g. you desperately need new features), you can still run your software in older versions of the target OS.

    I'm really curious as to what stops Linux developers from making Linux a truly backward compatible OS.

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    Linux primary goal is to be free and open source and so on, not to be the fastest, the best, or backward compatible. Personally i think its good, because linux needs to get rid of its not so great history, and at some point, after xxx years, well every sh1t will be together, then linux might try to implement such things as backward compatible.

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    Quote Originally Posted by startzz View Post
    Linux primary goal is to be free and open source and so on, not to be the fastest, the best, or backward compatible. Personally i think its good, because linux needs to get rid of its not so great history, and at some point, after xxx years, well every sh1t will be together, then linux might try to implement such things as backward compatible.
    Linux is already 20 years old. And it has gained exactly 0% usage points for the time being. How many years more does it need to become truly "good" in order to become ISVs friendly?

    Do we really need to sacrifice old working open source applications all the time? Qt2/3 based applications, GTK1/2 applications, etc. etc. etc.

    Not a single independent developer in their right mind will start releasing software for Linux given its ever-changing APIs.

    And why the hell Windows, MacOS, iOS and Android say nothing to you? They are wildly successful only because they truly care about compatibility and stability - the most basic things that Linux lacks.

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    Where does it say that it is backwards incompatible?
    Why should they remove symbols?

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    Quote Originally Posted by birdie View Post
    Linux is already 20 years old. And it has gained exactly 0% usage points for the time being. How many years more does it need to become truly "good" in order to become ISVs friendly?

    Do we really need to sacrifice old working open source applications all the time? Qt2/3 based applications, GTK1/2 applications, etc. etc. etc.

    Not a single independent developer in their right mind will start releasing software for Linux given its ever-changing APIs.

    And why the hell Windows, MacOS, iOS and Android say nothing to you? They are wildly successful only because they truly care about compatibility and stability - the most basic things that Linux lacks.
    Ever heard of shared library versioning? These are the num
    bers at the end of almost every .so file in /usr/lib/

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    Quote Originally Posted by birdie View Post
    Linux is already 20 years old. And it has gained exactly 0% usage points for the time being. How many years more does it need to become truly "good" in order to become ISVs friendly?

    Do we really need to sacrifice old working open source applications all the time? Qt2/3 based applications, GTK1/2 applications, etc. etc. etc.

    Not a single independent developer in their right mind will start releasing software for Linux given its ever-changing APIs.

    And why the hell Windows, MacOS, iOS and Android say nothing to you? They are wildly successful only because they truly care about compatibility and stability - the most basic things that Linux lacks.
    This one is really hard. I have a hard time telling if it's an average troll or actually through-the-roof retardation in person.

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    Quote Originally Posted by birdie View Post
    Linux is already 20 years old. And it has gained exactly 0% usage points for the time being. How many years more does it need to become truly "good" in order to become ISVs friendly?
    Linux is the most widely used kernel in the world. It's the largest software project in the history of mankind, with thousands of contributors and millions of lines of code. The quality of code in the Linux kernel is extremely high in its size class.

    Pretty much the only area where Linux doesn't see that much use is home user computers. Everywhere else, it shines.

    Do we really need to sacrifice old working open source applications all the time? Qt2/3 based applications, GTK1/2 applications, etc. etc. etc.
    Who's sacrificing them? What GTK1 applications are there that you'd want to use but can't? Do any of those even exist anymore? GTK2-based apps run just fine on any system. Plenty of GTK2 apps out there still, despite GTK3 having been out for ages now, they haven't gone anywhere. Eventually, most developers will want to port to more modern, better supported versions of toolkits, but they don't have to - you can still have old versions of toolkits alongside new ones, just like you can now have GTK2 and GTK3 working side to side in peace and harmony.

    Not a single independent developer in their right mind will start releasing software for Linux given its ever-changing APIs.
    What APIs are changing? The kernel has stable APIs, they have a rule of never breaking userland-facing APIs. Internal APIs do not matter.
    The X server has stable APIs, software written for X 10 years ago still works today.
    Toolkits provide client-side backwards compatibility within major versions, and between major versions doesn't matter because see above.

    And why the hell Windows, MacOS, iOS and Android say nothing to you? They are wildly successful only because they truly care about compatibility and stability - the most basic things that Linux lacks.
    Have you ever actually used a Linux-based OS?

    Linux is excellent in both compatibility and stability. Majority of all webservers run Linux because of it's great stability. Let's talk about Windows - they have apps that only work in Vista+above, 7+above, and now they have metro apps that only work in 8... forcing you to fork out more cash to be able to run the latest apps. With Linux, all you have to do is update and run.

    What problems with compatibility do you have with desktop Linux? Is there some Linux software you could run 5 years ago and can't today?

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    Quote Originally Posted by birdie View Post
    Yet another backward incompatible release?
    Glibc is perfectly backwards compatible - you can run apps built for glibc 2.0 on this. Perhaps the word you were looking for was forward compatible.

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