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Thread: Fedora 21 Will Try To Abandon Non-KMS GPU Drivers

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    Default Fedora 21 Will Try To Abandon Non-KMS GPU Drivers

    Phoronix: Fedora 21 Will Try To Abandon Non-KMS GPU Drivers

    There's hope that Fedora 21 will do away with non-KMS graphics drivers by default. A whole set of conventional (UMS) X.Org drivers are set to be retired in this first Fedora Linux release of 2014...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTQ0Njc

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    Can't say I like this - I was using r128 cards until earlier this year, so it seems likely that there are still users of them. i810 and Geode also seem a bit odd to me as hardware to abandon support for.

    Neither the article or the linked mailpost seem to give any particular rationale for it. Is there some maintenance or performance advantage to having only KMS drivers beyond that of abandoning individual ones?

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    Quote Originally Posted by FLHerne View Post
    Can't say I like this - I was using r128 cards until earlier this year, so it seems likely that there are still users of them. i810 and Geode also seem a bit odd to me as hardware to abandon support for.

    Neither the article or the linked mailpost seem to give any particular rationale for it. Is there some maintenance or performance advantage to having only KMS drivers beyond that of abandoning individual ones?
    There's not really any "maintenance" going in the Fedora camp. Ajax said that he basically only sees if it builds, and if it does, ship it. He also said that if anyone ELSE wants to maintain it, they are more than welcome to. But HE is done maintaining non-KMS drivers.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ericg View Post
    There's not really any "maintenance" going in the Fedora camp. Ajax said that he basically only sees if it builds, and if it does, ship it. He also said that if anyone ELSE wants to maintain it, they are more than welcome to. But HE is done maintaining non-KMS drivers.
    why UMS for vesa? can they run off KMS too. im saying this because Wayland needs KMS.

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    Quote Originally Posted by garegin View Post
    why UMS for vesa? can they run off KMS too. im saying this because Wayland needs KMS.
    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...tem&px=MTI4NTU is what I think you're looking for, Garegin

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    Quote Originally Posted by garegin View Post
    why UMS for vesa? can they run off KMS too. im saying this because Wayland needs KMS.
    you don't need KMS support for Wayland you only need it for Weston

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    Quote Originally Posted by LinuxGamer View Post
    you don't need KMS support for Wayland you only need it for Weston
    You only need it for hardware accelerated OSS drivers in Weston. Weston/Wayland has a software rendering backend (instead of using GL) which would likely be more appropriate for this hardware anyway, and it won't require KMS.

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    Quote Originally Posted by garegin View Post
    why UMS for vesa? can they run off KMS too. im saying this because Wayland needs KMS.
    Can they? I think they can't, is there any generic, vesa-like KMS driver on the kernel?

    Quote Originally Posted by dante View Post
    In few words , Fedora is trying to be buggy as possible
    On the contrary. Having more unmaintained code (drivers) means more bugs, and better yet, bugs that nobody is willing to fix, because they are unmaintained. VESA, while being generic, should work for everyone as long as it's maintained. Not optimal, but not as buggy as something unmaintained.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mrugiero View Post
    Can they? I think they can't, is there any generic, vesa-like KMS driver on the kernel?
    Vesa-KMS is being worked on. I think I posted the link to it on the first page.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mrugiero View Post
    Can they? I think they can't, is there any generic, vesa-like KMS driver on the kernel?
    There's xf86-video-modesetting, but I think it requires another driver to provide KMS...

    Quote Originally Posted by Kivada View Post
    Because I've been refurbishing junked Windows boxes with Linux for about a decade to donate and I wouldn't even bother donating a box that has less then 1.2Gb of ram and I don't even bother with the slower Pentium4 and Athlon CPUs these days. Priority parts to find: 64-bit CPUs, ram, R300 or Nvidia Geforce 6000 series or newer discrete GPUs, mobos with a Radeon X1200 series or an Nvidia 6100 series or newer IGP, mobos with 4 ram slots are of a higher priority. You get the picture? I usually collect 5-6 dumpster dived boxes before I dig through them and the drawers of parts I have and make 1-3 boxes that would be semi useful to someone that isn't a basement dwelling nerd. To date I've donated something like 35-40 Linux boxes, I have sold and traded a bunch more though.

    The boxes you describe I wouldn't even give away.

    The oldest thing I keep in active duty around the house is an Athlon64 3500+ Clawhammer w/ 2Gb of ram and my old 8800GTS as the public browser/spare gaming box, since it holds up surprisingly well even with modern titles like Amnesia: The Dark Descent, Legend Of Grimrock and Dungeon Defenders even at 1920x1200 with max settings if I leave out AA and AF, the CPU even manages to handle 720p playback of H.264 and WebM. The only games that I've tried on it that seem to be a bit too heavy are Half Life2 and Team Fortress2, I know for a fact that it could never run DOTA2 though.

    The only 15 year old hardware I would even consider keeping would be a dual socket 1.4Ghz Pentium3-S w/ DDR ram, such systems existed, but IIRC they where exceedingly rare as there was only one dual socket board with DDR ram and the 1.4Ghz P3-S was a very expensive chip, so getting 2 would be a rarity.
    We still have one PC that is using a GeForce 2 MX400 and 384 MiB RAM (it's not DDR RAM, it's one of those RAMs that were before even that) in the company whose computers I'm maintaining. But it's running a time-frozen Windows XP that isn't connected to the network. The reason why it's still kept around is for legacy connectivity – it has an LPT port which is required for a label printer we have, and since it's running 32-bit Windows, it is also capable of running 16-bit installers for legacy applications. I even installed an USB expansion card into it (made by VIA, actually) just a week ago, since it is usually given the task of scanning documents as well. Oh, and it also has a floppy drive, which we used for embroidery purposes until last week, when I switched the system to use CompactFlash instead of floppies. Of course I wouldn't even think of running any modern Linux distribution on it and expect it to work.
    Last edited by GreatEmerald; 08-29-2013 at 04:25 AM.

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