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Thread: It's Now Easier To Setup A Linux Payload For Coreboot

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  1. #1
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    Default It's Now Easier To Setup A Linux Payload For Coreboot

    Phoronix: It's Now Easier To Setup A Linux Payload For Coreboot

    One of the unique benefits of the Coreboot open-source BIOS/firmware project is that it can support loading the Linux kernel directly after initializing the motherboard -- instead of using GRUB2/SeaBIOS, the Linux kernel can be included on the ROM chip. This isn't a new feature to Coreboot, but with a Git commit made today it's now easier to configure...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTQ1MDY

  2. #2
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    Putting the Linux kernel on a rom BIOS chip is an exceptionally bad idea.
    Seems like the article might have a mistake, misunderstanding in it. They happen.

  3. #3
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    Really cool but as long as we don't have a mobo/laptop/HW that we can use this its useless.

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    Quote Originally Posted by plonoma View Post
    Putting the Linux kernel on a rom BIOS chip is an exceptionally bad idea.
    Seems like the article might have a mistake, misunderstanding in it. They happen.
    No mistake.

    Quote Originally Posted by http://www.coreboot.org/Payloads#Linux
    Linux

    coreboot can use a Linux kernel as payload directly. That is, the kernel is included in the ROM chip where coreboot resides.

    Alternatively, you can also boot a Linux kernel from your hard drive using either the FILO, GRUB2, or SeaBIOS payloads.

  5. #5
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    Default Boots fast

    With this you can boot a minimal Linux system (think no X) in like 1 second only.

  6. #6
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    I have been amazed this is not the common way to boot your system. With an optimized firmware like coreboot and a slim Linux setup modern hardware can boot in just a couple of seconds. Fedora can load in under 3 seconds, so the most time of boot is spent in BIOS/UEFI/BOOTLOADER on modern systems.
    Last edited by varikonniemi; 09-01-2013 at 03:59 AM.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by varikonniemi View Post
    I have been amazed this is not the common way to boot your system. With an optimized firmware like coreboot and a slim Linux setup modern hardware can boot in just a couple of seconds. Fedora can load in under 3 seconds, so the most time of boot is spent in BIOS/UEFI/BOOTLOADER on modern systems.
    Yes, but every kernel update (which for modern hardware specially, might bring interesting things) implies flashing the BIOS again. I don't know if there's any limit on how many times you can do that without side effects, but I'd expect that to exist. It's not usual to flash your BIOS once every two or three months, I don't think they are designed for such often updates.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by uid313 View Post
    With this you can boot a minimal Linux system (think no X) in like 1 second only.
    Yes, in much the same fashion as DeviceVM's Splashtop does. This minimal Linux kernel could be equipped with diagnostic tools and such for handling hardware/boot issues for example. Also would be cool to have an instant-on music or movie player for using your laptop as a multimedia player without booting Windows or your favorite distro

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    Quote Originally Posted by DeepDayze View Post
    Yes, in much the same fashion as DeviceVM's Splashtop does. This minimal Linux kernel could be equipped with diagnostic tools and such for handling hardware/boot issues for example. Also would be cool to have an instant-on music or movie player for using your laptop as a multimedia player without booting Windows or your favorite distro
    This I think would be a good idea if flash chips got big enough to include some good tools in an initrd. You wouldn't use it as your primary payload, but with a payload that let you select your payload.

    The other good place for direct loading would be secure systems to minimize the code you have to trust. Perhaps doubly useful with a micro-kernel where the core is well-reviewed and changes very slowly.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by DeepDayze View Post
    Yes, in much the same fashion as DeviceVM's Splashtop does. This minimal Linux kernel could be equipped with diagnostic tools and such for handling hardware/boot issues for example. Also would be cool to have an instant-on music or movie player for using your laptop as a multimedia player without booting Windows or your favorite distro
    Yeah, you could just get a terminal console/shell. From where you can run tools like dd, df, du, fdisk, fsck, etc. Maybe have tools like MemTest86 to check faulty memory.

    Or could boot straight into a web browser.

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