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Thread: EXT4 Gains Aggressive Extent Caching, Improved Recovery

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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
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    Default EXT4 Gains Aggressive Extent Caching, Improved Recovery

    Phoronix: EXT4 Gains Aggressive Extent Caching, Improved Recovery

    Ted Ts'o has filed his EXT4 file-system changes for the Linux 3.12 kernel, which includes two new features and various other fixes/refinements for this widely-used and stable Linux file-system...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTQ1NDI

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
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    Default ext5?

    ext4 keeps on gaining new features.
    Will there ever be a ext5?

    I guess they don't want a new code base, as that would mean more maintenance and more backporting and forwardporting bugfixes.

    This new feature makes benchmark of ext4-latest vs btrfs-latest more interesting.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by uid313 View Post
    ext4 keeps on gaining new features.
    Will there ever be a ext5?

    I guess they don't want a new code base, as that would mean more maintenance and more backporting and forwardporting bugfixes.

    This new feature makes benchmark of ext4-latest vs btrfs-latest more interesting.
    definitely makes it interesting. they only like to increment the version if there's a compellingly good reason to change the on disk format in an incompatible way. the fact that they can get these kinds of improvements said to me that ext4 is probably very well designed. aside from some features like checksumming data I don't think there is much they could add.

  4. #4
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by uid313 View Post
    ext4 keeps on gaining new features.
    Will there ever be a ext5?

    I guess they don't want a new code base, as that would mean more maintenance and more backporting and forwardporting bugfixes.

    This new feature makes benchmark of ext4-latest vs btrfs-latest more interesting.
    When Ext4 was released it was considered to be a stop-gap solution with Btrfs-- or a Btrfs-like filesystem-- to be the future. Now I don't know if the maintainers still feel that Ext4 is a 'stopgap' solution and Btrfs is still the future, but if they do that would most likely mean no Ext5 unless someone else wants to pick up the maintenance and development.

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