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Thread: Ivy Bridge-E Benchmarks Are Appealing For Linux

  1. #1
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    Default Ivy Bridge-E Benchmarks Are Appealing For Linux

    Phoronix: Ivy Bridge-E Benchmarks Are Appealing For Linux

    Intel recently released the Ivy Bridge Extreme Edition processors and the benchmark results are incredible...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTQ2MTY

  2. #2
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    Sure, the price is also Appealing. I bought a 6 core phenom II for less than $100 a couple of months ago for compiling software and it works pretty well, much faster than my "old" dual core. Obviously Intel's processor is faster but the i7-4960X costs $990, ten times more.

    Intel is like Nvidia in this regard, they sell good but overpriced products.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by phoronix View Post
    Phoronix: Ivy Bridge-E Benchmarks Are Appealing For Linux

    Intel recently released the Ivy Bridge Extreme Edition processors and the benchmark results are incredible...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTQ2MTY

    Your link does not bring me to a benchmark with the extreme edition... wrong link...
    http://openbenchmarking.org/result/1...SO-SYSTEM76L96
    thit is a Intel Core i7-4820K

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by wargames View Post
    Sure, the price is also Appealing. I bought a 6 core phenom II for less than $100 a couple of months ago for compiling software and it works pretty well, much faster than my "old" dual core. Obviously Intel's processor is faster but the i7-4960X costs $990, ten times more.

    Intel is like Nvidia in this regard, they sell good but overpriced products.
    Nvidia actually can compete with price with AMD. Maybe not their most powerful GPU available vs AMD's most powerful, but certainly GPUs that people actually use.

  5. #5
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    Default Wait for the Haswell E

    Intel Core i7 4960 AnandTech article

    In a few scenarios where all 6 cores are fully utilized, the 4960x performs better than a Haswell i7-4770k quad-core. But for the most part, the Haswell architecture performs better with a lower power usage profile. The price for a Haswell i7-4770k quad-core on Newegg is $339. The price of the 4960x is $1049.

    I would not understand why anyone would choose a 4960x over a 4770k.

    Here are the links to the 4960x benchmarks:
    http://openbenchmarking.org/result/1...AR-4960X358705
    http://openbenchmarking.org/result/1...AR-4960X240525

  6. #6
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    I'm sorry but I must be missing something? Unigine benchmarks are graphics benches not CPU. These results have more to do with the Titan than the Ivybridge-e CPU.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by PendragonUK View Post
    I'm sorry but I must be missing something? Unigine benchmarks are graphics benches not CPU. These results have more to do with the Titan than the Ivybridge-e CPU.
    I think you are exactly right. When I saw the numbers I thought "WTF!". Then I looked at the HW specs. All the tests are graphics, and the GC is an NVIDIA Titan. Sigh.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by mendieta View Post
    I think you are exactly right. When I saw the numbers I thought "WTF!". Then I looked at the HW specs. All the tests are graphics, and the GC is an NVIDIA Titan. Sigh.

    I own a Sandybridge-e rig, I built it last year. It was before the Titan so it has a pair of AMD 7970's. It was built for gaming and making Video's for Youtube.
    I used Windows for gaming and recording, then Linux for editing and rendering. Given the state of AMD drivers I do not get the benefit of the second card when in Linux.

    The step from Sandy to Ivy is a relatively small one. There is around a 10+% bump in per clock performance. The memory controller is better, allowing RAM speeds higher than 2133MHz. There are more PCI lanes and now PEI-e 3 is supported. There is a significant drop in power usage. The downside is that they do not overclock as well and get very hot very quickly much like the regular, non -e Ivybridge.

    The Sandy CPU's overclock to between 4.5 to 4.9 if you have a good one. The Ivy CPU's that have been tested max out at 4.5 if you are lucky and they will be chuffing hot. So there is very little benefit in upgrading, well at least from the enthusiast's point of view. If you were to be building a workstation/enthusiast rig today then yea, run an Ivybridge but if you have a Sandybridge already there is very little reason to upgrade. We need to wait for the next generation or maybe the one after that. I think we need to see a chipset change before we see real change on this platform otherwise it's going to be babysteps with incremental improvements.

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