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Thread: NVIDIA To Begin Publishing Open GPU Documentation

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Temlar View Post
    As a AMD user, I hope so.
    AMD is currently doing nothing, that steamroller must be a miracle, or else there is no bright future for them.
    I am an AMD user too, and I personally want to kick them in the butt. If it weren't for NVidia's gimping of the gaming cards when it comes to compute performance, I'd jumped ship long ago.

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by entropy View Post
    This is great news, ofc!

    Any ideas why they're doing this now?
    Is there any obvious reason for this?
    Valve/SteamBox?
    the first reason is hidden inside the 3.11 kernel
    and the second reason is r9 290x.

  3. #33
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    I won't read the whole thread, but yay for NVIDIA and their users.

  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yorgos View Post
    the first reason is hidden inside the 3.11 kernel
    I'm curious about that now...

  5. #35
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    Although it'll take much more to make me change my mind about nvidia being little more than a bunch of arrogant a-holes, it's still good news for everyone.

  6. #36
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    Default Christmas yet? <eom>


  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by xeekei View Post
    I bet the open source Nvidia driver will catch up to AMD's and embarrass them there too like they do with the proprietary ones. Nvidia always take drivers more seriously.
    as an AMD user I say: and everybody wins!

  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheLexMachine View Post
    Obvious reason? No. Not really. But there are quite a few reasons to do it and SteamBox is one of them because it will push Linux in the right direction. Nvidia has to squeeze every dollar it can out of the GPU market and it can't do that if it's tied to Windows as the OEM PC market isn't making them any real money and doesn't do anything for their reputation or brand. Look at the GPUs you find in desktops from HP, Dell, Asus, etc. and you can see that it's all low-end stuff with the occasional mid-range card. Look at a gaming PC that someone had made or built themselves and it's all mid-range and high-end. People are more likely to buy that high-end/mid-range card if they aren't forking over $100 for Windows when they can get SteamOS/Linux for free. Same applies to notebooks. A big problem with Linux and notebooks is that the GPU drivers haven't been that great until recently. With the improvements Nvidia has made in bringing Optimus support to Linux, it's a no-brainer that Linux users will opt for better hardware configs for SteamOS using Nvidia GPUs instead of low-end Intel/AMD GPUs. Then there's Tegra, which shares GPU driver code with desktop and laptop GPUs. It's all just part of the direction things are taking.
    I used to build my own gaming rigs... in retrospect, this is a waste of time - unless you're in it for the hobbyist/enthusiastic aspect, in the end it is always more expensive than buying an xbox, nintendo, PS, whatever..... plus, there are titles that are game console-specific that are the most interesting games to play (Zelda, for instance)... will likely never see a port to anything other than Nintendo. Your gaming rig will also be obsolete in about 6 months, while consoles last several years before they are updated.

    If you want to play games - buy a console. For work, buy a laptop with integrated GPUs (such as Intel's HD/Iris). Let us stop this dogma that one computer has to do it all and do it best - it shouldn't - unless you're willing to fork over a premium, and most people aren't.

  9. #39
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    Very good outcome, it will appreciated when they deliver results. They also need x86-mobile support: A Qemu acceleration processor with 70%+ efficiency like Loongson, or a deal with a x86 company with not above 20 million transistors per 3.5dmips/mhz core like a Pentium3 (256k cache). After that they need real Integer and Drystone for their GPUs, because they lose 5 times vs AMD and even a Titan (with a funnel shifter) loses 2x.

  10. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by MartinN View Post
    I used to build my own gaming rigs... in retrospect, this is a waste of time - unless you're in it for the hobbyist/enthusiastic aspect, in the end it is always more expensive than buying an xbox, nintendo, PS, whatever..... plus, there are titles that are game console-specific that are the most interesting games to play (Zelda, for instance)... will likely never see a port to anything other than Nintendo. Your gaming rig will also be obsolete in about 6 months, while consoles last several years before they are updated.

    If you want to play games - buy a console. For work, buy a laptop with integrated GPUs (such as Intel's HD/Iris). Let us stop this dogma that one computer has to do it all and do it best - it shouldn't - unless you're willing to fork over a premium, and most people aren't.

    While I do agree with you that not one computer has to do it all (necessary), I don't with the rest of your post.

    One big reason I never used consoles is because there's no keyboard/mouse support. I didn't grow up with controllers and can't get used to them. Having more control over the hardware and hardware brands you use is always a win.

    Furthermore I don't experience the price difference as you do. My last gaming pc I bought back in 2009 for a few hundred euro's. And while I might have paid a more for my pc, in the end I actually saved a lot of money because of cheaper games through steam.

    On top of that you always have a strong machine to do your professional stuff on. And I don't can about games like Zelda at all.


    There may not be a is-all end-all system for all applications, this does also imply there is no absolute gaming system that serves everybody. That's why we need applications to be cross-platform developed easily. Which is why SteamOS is such a great thing.

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