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Thread: performance of linux distributions

  1. #1

    Question performance of linux distributions

    hellow every body
    i have a pc with this specifications :
    mainboard : ASUS M2N-E
    CPU : AMD athlonx2 5200+
    RAM : 2* 512 MB = 1GB Patriot
    graphics : Geforce 7100 GS
    .....
    its a desktop PC for me
    and i installed UBUNTU 7.10 on it but my friends told me the performance of Debian is more
    can any one say his/her idea about this ?
    thanks

  2. #2
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    I don't think the performance is so differnet after boot. Debian stable aka etch is just older, or you use Kanotix which is etch + lots of new backports. But don't think that you gain more speed, your gfx cards is very slow, so when you need gaming performance put in a faster one (9600 GT or similar). RAM is also a bit low for some (commercial) games, not for standard office/internet usage. Maybe a newer kernel can improve hd performance if that is a problem.

    sudo -i

    hdparm -tT /dev/hda

    or

    hdparm -tT /dev/sda

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by majid_karimi59 View Post
    hellow every body
    i have a pc with this specifications :
    mainboard : ASUS M2N-E
    CPU : AMD athlonx2 5200+
    RAM : 2* 512 MB = 1GB Patriot
    graphics : Geforce 7100 GS
    .....
    its a desktop PC for me
    and i installed UBUNTU 7.10 on it but my friends told me the performance of Debian is more
    can any one say his/her idea about this ?
    thanks
    As Kano (one of the Live CD distribution developers...) has indicated, once the distribution is up, it's largely the same beast. There might be some background processes that cause overall differences in startup and maybe peak load ability, but in the end, it's all mostly the same for games, etc.

    Performance more comes from the hardware picks. 1Gb should be plenty for normal SOHO uses of that machine as will the display adapter. It's not quite as shallow as Kano implies with the RAM (2-4 is definitely nicer, but you shouldn't have issues with the 1 you have with most everything out there, games or similar apps...) the real sticking point is that 7100GS card.

    It'll "do" at lower resolutions (800x600, maybe 1024x768) for many of the older games and much of the ones that come with Ubuntu's repository, but much of the most recent stuff and the high-end repo stuff will simply grind your box to slide show framerates. An "adequate" bargain purchase would be a 8500GT (Note the GT, there...) as I've got one in a media center box with less CPU and it's holding decently on it's own with 1680x1020 resolution on a 42" setup If you've got a bit more budget and are wanting "more" then what Kano suggests is a decent enough choice.
    Last edited by Svartalf; 04-09-2008 at 09:19 AM.

  4. #4

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    at first thank you very much
    i must to say some thing can be eeficinet for you to help me
    1)i am not gamer but a simple software engineer and programmer
    2)i am very new in GNU and Linux world ... i was microsoft dependent and thereforce too little things i know about GNU and linux world
    3)i am very acquiescent from linux (ubuntu 7.10 64bit)
    but i thought is ththere a way to enhance the performance of my system or is there a higher performance ditribiution of linux
    4)when i see ram usage , it seems too many free ram remains to reach to 1GB even using Compizfiousion
    thanks very very much

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by majid_karimi59 View Post
    at first thank you very much
    You're very much welcome. Welcome to the Linux world.

    1)i am not gamer but a simple software engineer and programmer
    If you're doing any 3D at all, you're going to find that the "gamer" optimizations will seriously apply to you as well. I do a handful of things, including OpenGL visualization software, and keeping in mind that you don't NEED the high end, some gaming performance improvements never hurts.

    2)i am very new in GNU and Linux world ... i was microsoft dependent and thereforce too little things i know about GNU and linux world
    Again, welcome to the Linux world.

    There's things to know, things not to care about so much.

    Like with XP, there's tweaking you can do for an out of box setup. But the reality is, that you're usually only shaving about 1-5% off of the overall overhead when you do this sort of thing. There's not a lot of real inefficiencies present in the distributions overall, unlike the deltas between XP Home versus XP Professional versus a tweaked out XP Pro. Most people have their pet distribution and think that it's dramatically faster- in reality, unless you're compiling for i386 versus i586/Pentium, there's not a lot of real substantive differences in performance in the 32 bit space, and there's NOTHING substantive in the 64-bit space that'd show between the distributions. The only real deltas would be between the "feel good" performance differences between KDE and GNOME- and those tend to be more subjective than real.

    After what tweaks you can apply, there's only making your compile processes more efficiently use the machine or RAM/CPU upgrades as your performance improvements. Overall, Linux will perform better in most circumstances than Windows XP64 will, so you should see whatever peak is there in that machine in most cases.

    3)i am very acquiescent from linux (ubuntu 7.10 64bit)
    but i thought is ththere a way to enhance the performance of my system or is there a higher performance ditribiution of linux
    If you're running 64-bits, not without changing hardware. All you can do is turn off some background processes that might be eating cycles that you don't need to have running- in the end, they're going to be very similar in performance, especially where you're concerned- the compilers are going to generally perform at the same speed regardless. One thing you might want to know is that if you're concerned about compile times (the CPU you list is, while dual cored, slower than the bulk of many of the middle of the line and top of the line CPUs...) is that you can specify more than one compilation process/thread to be ran simultaneously (adding "-j 4" on to the first part of your make invocation (i.e. "make -j 4 <foo>, where "<foo>" is the rest of the options... Similar commands are available for other build tools...) will specify four compiles to be issued simultaneously) and to also add on things like ccache to your build process to add full-on cached compilation to it.

    4)when i see ram usage , it seems too many free ram remains to reach to 1GB even using Compizfiousion
    thanks very very much
    1Gb of RAM is often enough for development and office type work. However, if you're doing some aggressive C++ based work and issue in-parallel compilations, you may find you need a bit more along the lines of 2-3 Gb of it to work well.
    Last edited by Svartalf; 04-09-2008 at 12:54 PM.

  6. #6

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    thank you very very much for your help
    with respectfulness for you
    bye

  7. #7
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    and i installed UBUNTU 7.10 on it but my friends told me the performance of Debian is more
    actually ubuntu uses tracker process by default which kills any hopes for performance ;-)

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by yoshi314 View Post
    actually ubuntu uses tracker process by default which kills any hopes for performance ;-)
    Funny that... I nuke that thing out of the gate, less because it causes performance snags during logged in operation, and more because it bogs down login on fairly powerful machines to a 30-60 second crawl. Once you're past that it doesn't seem to cause TOO many issues with performance. Since I'm annoyed all to hell on my Laptop with this long delay, which each battery time, it goes bye-bye.
    Last edited by Svartalf; 04-09-2008 at 06:51 PM.

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