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Thread: Fedora 20 Officially Released

  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by intellivision View Post
    Great, so I'll just connect to my wireless to download the drivers...
    You see the problem with this scenario, it just doesn't work.


    Terrible, terrible idea by the GRUB team. This completely locks me out of using Fedora in this way, even though other distributions still offer the option to install GRUB2 wherever they like. Or, failing that, at least offer a bootloader through the installer that gives you the option to install in places other than the MBR.
    there is a blue hyperlink at bottom left of the installation destination screen which gives you the option not to install a boot loader at all. then after install is complete you can set things up how you like. if you want to install fedora's boot loader to a partition, switch to vt2 at the end of install. the installed system is under /mnt/sysimage, and you can run grub2-mkconfig and grub2-install --force /Dev/sda1 or whatever.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by RahulSundaram View Post
    gconf is not used in GNOME Shell at all. GNOME 3 uses dconf (and gsettings) and you should either use dconf-editor or gsettings in the command line though the particular tweak you are trying to make may not be supported in GNOME 3 anyway.
    Err... It used to be working on my fedora installs in gnome 3.8. What are you talking about?

  3. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bucic View Post
    Err... It used to be working on my fedora installs in gnome 3.8. What are you talking about?
    GNOME and other gconf-using apps have been gradually migrating settings from gconf to dconf ever since 3.0. Every Fedora / GNOME release, a few more things get migrated. Not much is left using gconf any more.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
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    [GNOME] Public Service Announcement for Fedora users upgrading using fedup

    Posted by Richard Schwarting at 05:05
    Labels: #GNOME, fedora, fedora 20, fedup, update
    Consider updating fedup to 0.8.0 from updates-testing

    # yum update --enablerepo=updates-testing fedup

    Or else you may end up with a broken System Upgrade.

    https://bugzilla.redhat.com/show_bug.cgi?id=1044346
    https://bugzilla.redhat.com/show_bug.cgi?id=1044086
    Source
    This sort of stuff is the reason I'm willing to wait a bit more. I expect the update will have reached the normal update repo in 1.5 week?

  5. #25
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    Oct 2009
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    2,081

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    Quote Originally Posted by intellivision View Post
    Great, so I'll just connect to my wireless to download the drivers...
    You see the problem with this scenario, it just doesn't work.
    Hmm, its been quite a long time since I've encountered a wifi card that didn't work out of the box with (recent) Fedora. Mind identifying it?
    Also, you identify the wireless as "my wireless", which says that you own it, and therefore have control of it. If that is the case, that you do have physical access to it, why not just plug in a wire?

    Also, you may find a simple, yet interesting solution to this problem if you have a halfway decent smartphone: Connect your smartphone to your wifi (or use mobile data if you have an unlimited plan), and tether your computer via BLUETOOTH or USB to the phone. I realize that this won't happen if your phone is incapable of this, but if it does, you have easy access to the proprietary driver.

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kostas View Post
    This sort of stuff is the reason I'm willing to wait a bit more. I expect the update will have reached the normal update repo in 1.5 week?
    Fedora upgrade has always been pretty scary. Usually what I do, is backup my home partition (and maybe var, depending on the installation), unplug my data disks, wipe, install, restore home. Its the most foolproof/clean way to upgrade an OS.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by AdamW View Post
    GNOME and other gconf-using apps have been gradually migrating settings from gconf to dconf ever since 3.0. Every Fedora / GNOME release, a few more things get migrated. Not much is left using gconf any more.
    I see. All exdplained under the link below. Thanks for your input!
    http://forums.fedoraforum.org/showthread.php?p=1680505

  8. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kostas View Post
    This sort of stuff is the reason I'm willing to wait a bit more. I expect the update will have reached the normal update repo in 1.5 week?
    Oh, dear - the wording on that note could have been better. "Broken System Upgrade" sounds scary, but really, "System Upgrade" is just the boot menu entry that launches fedup's second stage. If you try to upgrade with fedup 0.7 that fails and immediately reboots. But your system isn't broken - it books back to F19 fine, and you can easily recover the upgrade just by using 0.8. I haven't run into anyone who lost data or configuration or anything through this issue, and they were all able to upgrade successfully with 0.8.

    The 0.8 builds are currently queued for stable for both F18 and F19, they should be pushed today and work their way out to the mirrors over today and tomorrow, I think.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Rural Alberta, Canada
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    While my own personal involvement with Fedora has decreased since I moved my main machine over to Arch last February, I have already upgraded my brothers machine to Fedora 20 and so far he and I are quite pleased with it.

    Anaconda has improved by leaps and bounds, with only the software selection screen still being something of a disappointment, with it being limited to the selection of only one desktop environment and still without the ability to individually select packages, as far as I could tell. Still, it was at least error free, and the partition manager worked very well, something I had been avoiding before out of concerns about how it looked. For the first time in my life upon installing Fedora I did not need to tell it that I lived closer to Edmonton than Boston, although I am still pleasantly baffled as to how it even managed to know this. Language and Keyboard selection worked absolutely fine, and I was even able to point the installer to our second WISP through the network settings just as easily as if the system were already installed. The best feature that I had already noticed about the new Anaconda, the fact that you could setup passwords and user settings while it is installing packages, was of course still present and fully functional.

    I do not know how many of these things are new in Fedora 20, as I only installed Fedora 19 once on our HTPC and Fedora 18 once if one does not count the Beta, but from what I remembered things have shaped up quite nicely since those past two experiences. Once installed the Xfce defaults have also become a little more pleasant, with light-dm offering a more attractive login screen as well as a few other mostly inconsequential goodies. The lack of an expansive package selection screen in the installer was soon remedied by using yum, and the system was back in good working order again in no time.

    All and in all, a pretty fantastic release to mark 10 years for the Fedora team. Congratulations.
    Last edited by Hamish Wilson; 12-18-2013 at 02:09 PM.

  10. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hamish Wilson View Post
    While my own personal involvement with Fedora has decreased since I moved my main machine over to Arch last February, I have already upgraded my brothers machine to Fedora 20 and so far he and I are quite pleased with it.

    Anaconda has improved by leaps and bounds, with only the software selection screen still being something of a disappointment, with it being limited to the selection of only one desktop environment and still without the ability to individually select packages, as far as I could tell. Still, it was at least error free, and the partition manager worked very well, something I had been avoiding before out of concerns about how it looked. For the first time in my life upon installing Fedora I did not need to tell it that I lived closer to Edmonton than Boston, although I am still pleasantly baffled as to how it even managed to know this. Language and Keyboard selection worked absolutely fine, and I was even able to point the installer to our second WISP through the network settings just as easily as if the system were already installed. The best feature that I had already noticed about the new Anaconda, the fact that you could setup passwords and user settings while it is installing packages, was of course still present and fully functional.

    I do not know how many of these things are new in Fedora 20, as I only installed Fedora 19 once on our HTPC and Fedora 18 once if one does not count the Beta, but from what I remembered things have shaped up quite nicely since those past two experiences. Once installed the Xfce defaults have also become a little more pleasant, with light-dm offering a more attractive login screen as well as a few other mostly inconsequential goodies. The lack of an expansive package selection screen in the installer was soon remedied by using yum, and the system was back in good working order again in no time.

    All and in all, a pretty fantastic release to mark 10 years for the Fedora team. Congratulations.
    Thanks Hamish! Glad it worked out well for you.

    There is actually a trick to install multiple desktops: pick 'Basic Desktop Environment' (or something like that) at the bottom of the list, and then each desktop is available as an optional group on the right. You don't get quite the full package sets installing this way, but it should give you something that works.

    anaconda knows where you are due to our close working relationship with the NSA; I like the socks you're wearing today, but are you sure red is appropriate for the occasion?

    No, seriously, we added GeoIP support - if we manage to bring the network up early enough, we use GeoIP to get a location guess based purely on your IP address, which is usually close enough for making a decent guess at your locale and timezone.

    The GeoIP stuff is new in 20, and we fixed quite a lot of bugs and bad designs in the language and keyboard settings stuff for 20. We did fix a lot of bugs in partitioning too, though that's such a huge area there are certainly more remaining.

    Again, glad you enjoyed it!

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