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Thread: Intel Haswell Linux Performance Improved A Lot In 2013

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    Default Intel Haswell Linux Performance Improved A Lot In 2013

    Phoronix: Intel Haswell Linux Performance Improved A Lot In 2013

    With the end of the year quickly approaching, at Phoronix I have been re-testing all of the Linux graphics drivers to see how the performance has changed in 2013 and the features added/removed over the calendar year. I've been doing these annual Linux driver yearly recaps going back to 2005 when Linux GPU drivers were in their infancy compared to Windows. Yesterday I started with the NVIDIA 2013 Linux Year-In-Review of their first-rate binary driver while today I have some performance tests done for Intel's latest-generation Haswell graphics hardware.

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=19596

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    This wasn't shown in the plots. But i think most of the performance gain was reflected in Ubuntu 13.10 already. The dramatic change was in kernel 3.10 and Mesa 9. It would have been nice to have Ubuntu 13.10 in the mix, really. But there seem to be some (not nearly as dramatic) improvements in the newest kernel, which is exciting.

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    http://openbenchmarking.org/embed.ph...ha=c4e7511&p=2
    When I have a bunch of spikes it's a bad signal, but when I have just two spikes... what it means?

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    Quote Originally Posted by rudregues View Post
    http://openbenchmarking.org/embed.ph...ha=c4e7511&p=2
    When I have a bunch of spikes it's a bad signal, but when I have just two spikes... what it means?
    First spike... GPU was in low power state and it took it a half second to ramp up, causing that frame to take longer. The other spike... who knows. Maybe momentary GPU deadlock?

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    Quote Originally Posted by rudregues View Post
    http://openbenchmarking.org/embed.ph...ha=c4e7511&p=2
    When I have a bunch of spikes it's a bad signal, but when I have just two spikes... what it means?
    It typically means that your CPU has too many pins. Make sure you remove 2 CPU pins and see if the spikes still occur, if so, it could be
    due to high power voltage which you can test by getting rid of the power sockets from the wall and stick in your tongue, if it feels like more
    than 220 Watts you should call an electrician.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mark45 View Post
    It typically means that your CPU has too many pins. Make sure you remove 2 CPU pins and see if the spikes still occur, if so, it could be
    due to high power voltage which you can test by getting rid of the power sockets from the wall and stick in your tongue, if it feels like more
    than 220 Watts you should call an electrician.
    Are you serious about the 220 volts part?

    And by pins, do you mean the power cable? If you removed 2 pins on the CPU itself, it would no longer work.

  7. #7
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    Can I assume that this is just for the on-dye graphics and the actual CPU performance remains the same?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Calinou View Post
    Are you serious about the 220 volts part?

    And by pins, do you mean the power cable? If you removed 2 pins on the CPU itself, it would no longer work.
    for anyone who can't read the dripping mockery in mark45's post... no don't do that, it should be obvious but just... don't

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    Quote Originally Posted by Calinou View Post
    Are you serious about the 220 volts part?

    And by pins, do you mean the power cable? If you removed 2 pins on the CPU itself, it would no longer work.
    Yes, the problem might be with the electricity, one can measure it with a special gadget but it's old fashioned since you can do it quickly by sticking your tongue into the wall outlet, if it causes a little rash on your tongue - the electricity is OK. Though it's better to do this test in your bathroom so that your feet are a little wet so that you have a more precise feeling about the quality of the electricity in your house.

    And yes, I mean the CPU pins. Intel's last gen chips use hyper threading which trickles down through many CPU pins to your motherboard - this wastes a lot of time and electricity, if you remove some pins it will run quicker and consume less power because the CPU becomes smaller. That's why some people use a little hammer to chop off some silicon from the CPU here and there to make it lighter and faster, but since they often end up splitting the CPU you should do it the safe way and hit it with a dead lizard instead because it's softer than a hammer.

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    I'm cracking up. Mark, what does it take to have you in my next party? I have some pretty decent wines in my cellar ... and I promise ample supply of dead lizards in case we run a lan party.

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