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Thread: AMD A10-7850K Kaveri: The Linux Introduction

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by jakubo View Post
    Has AMD published any documentation/guidelines on how to program for HSA enabled chips? Or will AMD be doing the same mistakes as with 64bit computing...? IIRC linux-based distros were the first OSes to support 64 bit back then.
    I cant really see it failing. Ok maybe I am a bit to focused on gaming. That is a potenzial gaming cpu.

    If its not impossible to include in Windows or Microsoft only supports it for windows 8 or something (maybe that is the one pseudofeature they have to force most people that hate windows 8 to use it) or sony somehow is able to pay their partners to sabotage the games for windows or something like that. If not something cracy like that happens. The software support at least for gaming will be there!

    Why am I saying that. Think about it, PS4 and Xbone succeed or fail with HSA support. 99% of all highend games came in last years first on the consoles and that will not change much für ps4xbone, so all this highend games will be optimised heavy on hsa.

    I mean basicly it has the raw cpu power only from a richland, which is a 4-modul cpu like my fx4150 I think, so maybe its 20% faster than my machine or so on the cpu side (needs only around 50Watt less power for it ^^) I get in Planetside 2 with medium settings or so, 20-30fps.

    Planetside 2 will come out with ultra settings and 60fps. so they will use hsa heavily.

    On the other site in tests of computerbase.de they messure 80fps in planetside 2, I have that maybe sometimes, too, but thats than best case szenario with no or not much player around me.

    Or did I miss something and richland hat 100% more ipc? ^^

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by bridgman View Post
    Really should have a newer kernel than the 3.11 that comes with Saucy, will update that next, but so far the open source stack seems to be working OK. For what it's worth, this is more in line with what we expected since we pushed initial Kaveri open source driver support back in Sept or Oct last year.
    OK, bumped up to a 3.12 release kernel -- that seems to have fixed a hang when switching resolutions in Xonotic, and the system now runs the game decently at 1600x1200. It's an early engineering sample, not even sure how many CPU cores or GPU CUs it has but will check tomorrow.

    Probably 2 CPU cores, 4 GPU CUs and 160 watts

    Quote Originally Posted by jakubo View Post
    Has AMD published any documentation/guidelines on how to program for HSA enabled chips? Or will AMD be doing the same mistakes as with 64bit computing...? IIRC linux-based distros were the first OSes to support 64 bit back then.
    The programmers reference manual is up in the Standards section of the HSA Foundation site, and a number of other docs are working their way through the standards groups.

    http://www.hsafoundation.com

  3. #33
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    Why has AMD nothing similar like ark.intel.com? You can compare every Intel chip there which ease. For AMD you have to use Wikipedia, but that's not really what you want to use as customer.

  4. #34
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  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kano View Post
    Why has AMD nothing similar like ark.intel.com? You can compare every Intel chip there which ease. For AMD you have to use Wikipedia, but that's not really what you want to use as customer.
    Why not? I never use manufacturer sites for parts comparisons, the tables on wikipedia are always much more detailed. I would rather Intel just contribute the tables for their parts than host ark.intel.com.

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kano View Post
    Why has AMD nothing similar like ark.intel.com? You can compare every Intel chip there which ease. For AMD you have to use Wikipedia, but that's not really what you want to use as customer.
    I find ark.intel.com useless, because it does not list many useful details, such as the codename. No I don't care about i-somethingmeaningless, tell me if this is a sandy or ivy dammit!

  7. #37
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    Forgot to add that I use cpuworld instead. It has all the useful info, while also being a faster to load site.

  8. #38
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    If you don't see the FORMER codename you are just blind. Example:

    http://ark.intel.com/products/75123

    Then you see in related products "Products formerly Haswell". This entry should be there for every cpu - well some see it some do not

  9. #39
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    Well that's a fucking unintuitive place to put the info. I would also argue that "related products" being Haswell doesn't guarantee that this product is Haswell.

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