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Humble Introversion Bundle Pulls In $778k USD

Gaming

Published on 06 December 2011 08:51 PM EST
Written by Michael Larabel in Gaming
6 Comments

The Humble Introversion Bundle sale ended this afternoon as the two-week period of paying what you want for a collection of cross-platform, DRM-free games. This latest bundle fell just short of 200k sales and generating $800k USD.

Key numbers from the Humble Introversion Bundle:

- 190,258 Bundles Sold
- $778,512.90 USD Total
- Average Price: $4.09
- Average Windows Price: $3.40
- Average Mac OS X Price: $5.90
- Average Linux Price: $8.77
- Highest Price: $1,250.00

While pulling in just shy of $800k USD during a two-week period for some games that are going on being a decade old isn't bad for indie games, this is the weakest performance yet of a Humble Indie Bundle.

The previous bundle, the Humble Voxatron Bundle, fell just short of one million dollars. The first bundle pulled in over $1.2M, the second bundle did $1.8M, the Frozenbyte Bundle managed $0.9M, Humble Indie Bundle 3 snatched over $2.1M, and the Humble Frozen Synapse Bundle raked in $1.1M.

The total number of purchases made isn't very different from earlier Humble Indie Bundles (in fact it's more than the 172k purchases of the last bundle), but it's the average price that people are willing to pay is what fell sharply. Gamers were paying over $9 on average for the original bundle and generally around $5 or more for the other offerings, but with this latest bundle it's just over $4.

Of course, the selection of titles this time around wasn't too impressive and some gamers may have already had them as part of their collection. From Introversion Software was Uplink, a title from 2001, Darwinia from 2005, DEFCON from 2006, Multiwinia from 2008, and then the only new titles were Windows-only tech demos (Voxel Tech Demo and City Generator Tech Demo). The extra games were Aquaria, Crayon Physics Deluxe, and Dungeons of Dredmor, two of which were recycled from earlier Humble Indie Bundles.

On top of that, even with these old games and their lackluster graphics, some don't even work with Mesa/Gallium3D drivers.

Introversion Software, however, seems quite happy with the bundle. Written to the Introversion blog are some comments. "This is the biggest single sale Introversion has ever done on any platform, even beating the epic Steam promotions we run from time to time. It roughly equates to one sale every six seconds. And the best part of all - the part that makes me most happy, is that this promotion has doubled the number of people who have played our games. 180,000 is more copies than our best selling game Darwinia ever sold, and the Humble Bundle includes all four of our games, so that means twice as many people have now played each of our games than before the bundle. That's pretty cool. As the principle game creator here at Introversion, that's the biggest thing for me." (This is in contrast to the SteelStorm developer from the record-setting Humble Indie Bundle #3 that doesn't even want to be associated with Humble Indie Bundles again.)

There's no word what games will be part of the next Humble Indie Bundle collection, but hopefully it will be a more compelling offering to avoid indie bundle fatigue. I also wouldn't be surprised to see this next Humble Indie Bundle begin within the next few days as a holiday push.

About The Author
Michael Larabel is the principal author of Phoronix.com and founded the web-site in 2004 with a focus on enriching the Linux hardware experience and being the largest web-site devoted to Linux hardware reviews, particularly for products relevant to Linux gamers and enthusiasts but also commonly reviewing servers/workstations and embedded Linux devices. Michael has written more than 10,000 articles covering the state of Linux hardware support, Linux performance, graphics hardware drivers, and other topics. Michael is also the lead developer of the Phoronix Test Suite, Phoromatic, and OpenBenchmarking.org automated testing software. He can be followed via and or contacted via .
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