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LLVM Leaps Ahead With Its Migration To C++11

Compiler

Published on 01 March 2014 06:02 AM EST
Written by Michael Larabel in Compiler
2 Comments

Ending out February, compiler developer Chandler Carruth at Google flipped the upstream LLVM build systems to building under C++11 by default. So far nothing has broken and in the days ahead they will carry out more tests in their approach to now using C++11 features by default as they develop this leading compiler infrastructure.

LLVM/Clang for a few releases has supported C++11 but the compiler code itself has been written in C++98. However, it was agreed upon following the most recent LLVM/Clang 3.4 release that the compiler developers themselves would be free to rely upon C++11 features.

LLVM developers for a few times have been after using C++11 functionality but now for the LLVM 3.5 release cycle they have finally agreed to allow it now that C++11 support is widespread enough upstream for supporting it as the host compiler. This C++11 usage is just not for LLVM itself but also Clang and other LLVM sub-projects where they're free to write C++11 code, albeit it's a targeted subset of C++11 for broad compatibility.

The new host compiler requirements for LLVM going forward are slated to be Microsoft Visual Studio 2012, Clang 3.1, and GCC 4.7.

When the build systems switched over on Friday to compiling in C++11 mode, nothing appeared to break and over the weekend Chandler Carruth will begin removing support for building in C++98 mode. These details were shared Friday night on the LLVM mailing list. The new C++11 coding standards being evaluated by LLVM developers are documented on this web-page.

About The Author
Michael Larabel is the principal author of Phoronix.com and founded the web-site in 2004 with a focus on enriching the Linux hardware experience and being the largest web-site devoted to Linux hardware reviews, particularly for products relevant to Linux gamers and enthusiasts but also commonly reviewing servers/workstations and embedded Linux devices. Michael has written more than 10,000 articles covering the state of Linux hardware support, Linux performance, graphics hardware drivers, and other topics. Michael is also the lead developer of the Phoronix Test Suite, Phoromatic, and OpenBenchmarking.org automated testing software. He can be followed via and or contacted via .
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