Longtime Ubuntu Developer Martin Pitt Leaving Canonical, Joining Red Hat
Written by Michael Larabel in Ubuntu on 13 December 2016 at 09:15 AM EST. 23 Comments
UBUNTU --
Ubuntu developer Martin Pitt who has been with Canonical for the past twelve and a half years as one of the original Ubuntu developers has decided to leave the organization and join Red Hat.

The longtime and well known Ubuntu developer shared on his blog that he's leaving Canonical at the end of the year to join Red Hat. Explaining his reasoning for leaving Canonical, "one major reason for me leaving is that after that long time I am simply in need for a “reboot”: I’ve piled up so many little and large things that I can hardly spend one day on developing something new without hopelessly falling behind in responding to pings about fixing low-level stuff, debugging weird things, handholding infrastructure, explaining how things (should) work, do urgent archive/SRU/maintenance tasks, and whatnot (“it’s related to boot, it probably has systemd in the name, let’s hand it to pitti”). I’ve repeatedly tried to rid myself of some of those or at least find someone else to share the load with, but it’s too sticky :-/"

Over his tenure working on Ubuntu he's done a lot of the work on systemd integration, UDisks/UPower, other low-level/kernel work like enabling SSD TRIM support by default for Ubuntu, and much more. When he begins at Red Hat in January he will be working on their Cockpit project as well as some related Linux plumbing. Good luck with your future work Pitti!
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Michael Larabel is the principal author of Phoronix.com and founded the site in 2004 with a focus on enriching the Linux hardware experience. Michael has written more than 10,000 articles covering the state of Linux hardware support, Linux performance, graphics drivers, and other topics. Michael is also the lead developer of the Phoronix Test Suite, Phoromatic, and OpenBenchmarking.org automated benchmarking software. He can be followed via Twitter or contacted via MichaelLarabel.com.

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