VESA Pushes Out DisplayID 2.0 As The Successor To EDID For Monitors & Electronics
Written by Michael Larabel in Standards on 14 November 2017 at 12:12 PM EST. 18 Comments
STANDARDS --
DisplayID 2.0 is now official as the VESA standard to succeed the long-used Extended Display Identification Data "EDID" by TVs, monitors, and other consumer electronics.

DisplayID 2.0 is designed to fill the needs of modern hardware with 4K+ resolutions, High Dynamic Range, Adaptive-Sync, AR/VR, and other use-cases not conceived when EDID first premiered in the 90's as part of the DDC standard. Over EDID and E-EDID, DisplayID switches to using a variable length data structure and makes other fundamental design differences compared to these older identification standards.

In today's VESA press release they further describe DisplayID 2.0:
The key difference between DisplayID 2.0 and EDID predecessors is its modular structure, based on the concept of “data blocks” – individually defined, self-contained data formats that each provide a specific set of related display information in a clear unambiguous manner. This benefit affords unprecedented flexibility, as entire content can be constructed from any number of elements, predefined data blocks or descriptors. The specification addresses head-mounted and other types of wearable displays; provides a clearer way to define Adaptive-Sync (i.e., dynamic refresh rate); extends field sizes to support higher pixel counts; expands the magnitude of parameters needed to enable HDR; and supports high luminance, to name just a few of the advanced technologies that DisplayID 2.0 covers.

Expect for DisplayID 2.0 support to begin surfacing in 2018.

Hopefully this post didn't remind you of the old days of Linux/X.Org with monitor/EDID problems being common, xorg.conf tuning for monitors, and other nostalgic Linux desktop experiences... Let's hope the DisplayID 2.0 rollout will go smoothly.

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Michael Larabel is the principal author of Phoronix.com and founded the site in 2004 with a focus on enriching the Linux hardware experience. Michael has written more than 10,000 articles covering the state of Linux hardware support, Linux performance, graphics drivers, and other topics. Michael is also the lead developer of the Phoronix Test Suite, Phoromatic, and OpenBenchmarking.org automated benchmarking software. He can be followed via Twitter or contacted via MichaelLarabel.com.

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